2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164960
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Helping Oncology Nurses Meet Their Patients' Spiritual Care Needs
Author(s):
Fenerty, Norma; Stewart,Katie
Author Details:
Norma Fenerty, Norma, RN,C, BSN, OCN, RN Case Manager, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: Norma.Fenerty@fccc.edu; Katie Stewart, MSPH
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Spiritual care has become an essential component to holistic nursing care in oncology. A Spiritual Care Resource Nurse (SCRN) program was initiated at this NCI-designated institution in December 2006, after two years of preparation by the multidisciplinary Spiritual Care Committee. A selected group of nurses were trained to help direct care nurses better meet holistic care needs of patients, consistent with Joint Commission standards addressing patients' spiritual needs. The evidence indicates that individuals are interested in discussing spiritual issues with their healthcare providers and some patients experience greater religiosity and strengthening of their faith through their disease process. The SCRN program was developed as a "resource" program, such that nurses act as a resource to their nurse colleagues and are familiar with the spiritual resources available to the patients (e.g., pastoral care, video-on-demand). Presence as a means of attending to the spiritual needs of patients has been emphasized. A 10 question survey was sent to the RN staff (total 304), to evaluate nurses' knowledge of the SCRN program; to assess nurses' comfort in completing the cultural/spiritual portion of the nursing admission history; and to evaluate nurses' knowledge of spiritual care resources available. Eighty-one responses were received. Although almost 90% of these RNs had knowledge of the SCRN program, many areas were identified for teaching opportunities to improve direct care nurses' interactions with their patients in the area of spiritual care (e.g., comfort in making referrals, awareness of resources available to patients in the institution). As nursing staff are involved in direct care of the cancer patient, especially at pivotal moments in the area of their spirituality, it is important that the nurse be comfortable with these expressions as well as sensitive to the patient's individuality, preferences, and boundaries. The SCRNs will work to enhance the program to further assist oncology nurses at this institution with meeting the spiritual care needs of their patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHelping Oncology Nurses Meet Their Patients' Spiritual Care Needsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFenerty, Normaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart,Katieen_US
dc.author.detailsNorma Fenerty, Norma, RN,C, BSN, OCN, RN Case Manager, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: Norma.Fenerty@fccc.edu; Katie Stewart, MSPHen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164960-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Spiritual care has become an essential component to holistic nursing care in oncology. A Spiritual Care Resource Nurse (SCRN) program was initiated at this NCI-designated institution in December 2006, after two years of preparation by the multidisciplinary Spiritual Care Committee. A selected group of nurses were trained to help direct care nurses better meet holistic care needs of patients, consistent with Joint Commission standards addressing patients' spiritual needs. The evidence indicates that individuals are interested in discussing spiritual issues with their healthcare providers and some patients experience greater religiosity and strengthening of their faith through their disease process. The SCRN program was developed as a "resource" program, such that nurses act as a resource to their nurse colleagues and are familiar with the spiritual resources available to the patients (e.g., pastoral care, video-on-demand). Presence as a means of attending to the spiritual needs of patients has been emphasized. A 10 question survey was sent to the RN staff (total 304), to evaluate nurses' knowledge of the SCRN program; to assess nurses' comfort in completing the cultural/spiritual portion of the nursing admission history; and to evaluate nurses' knowledge of spiritual care resources available. Eighty-one responses were received. Although almost 90% of these RNs had knowledge of the SCRN program, many areas were identified for teaching opportunities to improve direct care nurses' interactions with their patients in the area of spiritual care (e.g., comfort in making referrals, awareness of resources available to patients in the institution). As nursing staff are involved in direct care of the cancer patient, especially at pivotal moments in the area of their spirituality, it is important that the nurse be comfortable with these expressions as well as sensitive to the patient's individuality, preferences, and boundaries. The SCRNs will work to enhance the program to further assist oncology nurses at this institution with meeting the spiritual care needs of their patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:03Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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