2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164964
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
REDUCING THE RISK OF LYMPHEDEMA: KNOWLEDGE, MOTIVATION, AND BEHAVIORS
Author(s):
Fu, Mei; Haber, Judith; Guth, Amber A.; Axelrod, Deborah
Author Details:
Mei Fu, RN, PhD, ACNS-BC, Assistant Professor, New York University, New York, New York, USA, email: mf67@nyu.edu; Judith Haber, PhD, APRN-BC, FAAN; Amber A. Guth, MD, NYU Clinical Cancer Center, New York, New York
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Despite advances in treatment, many breast cancer patients still face permanent disruption of their lymphatic system which predisposes them to the risk for lymphedema (swelling). Lymphedema exerts negative impact on patient's quality of life. Lack of research examining patients' lymphedema knowledge in relation to patients' motivation, behavioral skills, and practice of risk reduction behaviors has hindered our progress in identifying and developing effective strategies to reduce the risk of lymphedema. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among patients' lymphedema knowledge, motivation, behavioral skills, and practice of risk reduction behaviors. The study was based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral [IMB] Model that emphasizes the need for patients to have adequate information relevant to a particular health issue (lymphedema risk) as the primary prerequisite to initiate a health behavior (lymphedema risk reduction behavior). Individual is viewed as an active participant in a behavioral change process. Accordingly, personal and social motivation and behavioral skills are essential for initiating and maintaining health behaviors (lymphedema risk reduction behaviors). A cross-sectional design was used to collect data from 136 patients using a Demographic and Medical Information interview tool, Knowledge Test, and Lymphedema Risk Reduction: Motivation and Behavioral Skill, and Lymphedema Risk Reduction Behavior Checklist. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlation coefficients, and regression. Participants with higher lymphedema knowledge had significantly higher behavioral skills (r=0.48; p<0.000); and significantly higher behavioral skills are associated with higher personal motivation (r=0.371; p<0.000) and social motivation (r=0.628; p<0.000). Importantly, more risk reduction behaviors were reported by participants with higher knowledge (r=0.49; p<0.000), higher behavioral skills (r=0.328; p<0.000), higher personal motivation (r=0.448; p<0.000) and social motivation (r=0.338; p<0.000). Knowledge is a significant predictor for behavioral skills while personal motivation for practice of risk reduction behaviors. Findings of the study underscore that provision of lymphedema information is a critical dimension of risk reduction. Nurses and other healthcare professionals should consider taking initiatives to provide patients with adequate information to enhance lymphedema risk reduction.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleREDUCING THE RISK OF LYMPHEDEMA: KNOWLEDGE, MOTIVATION, AND BEHAVIORSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFu, Meien_US
dc.contributor.authorHaber, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuth, Amber A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAxelrod, Deborahen_US
dc.author.detailsMei Fu, RN, PhD, ACNS-BC, Assistant Professor, New York University, New York, New York, USA, email: mf67@nyu.edu; Judith Haber, PhD, APRN-BC, FAAN; Amber A. Guth, MD, NYU Clinical Cancer Center, New York, New Yorken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164964-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Despite advances in treatment, many breast cancer patients still face permanent disruption of their lymphatic system which predisposes them to the risk for lymphedema (swelling). Lymphedema exerts negative impact on patient's quality of life. Lack of research examining patients' lymphedema knowledge in relation to patients' motivation, behavioral skills, and practice of risk reduction behaviors has hindered our progress in identifying and developing effective strategies to reduce the risk of lymphedema. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among patients' lymphedema knowledge, motivation, behavioral skills, and practice of risk reduction behaviors. The study was based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral [IMB] Model that emphasizes the need for patients to have adequate information relevant to a particular health issue (lymphedema risk) as the primary prerequisite to initiate a health behavior (lymphedema risk reduction behavior). Individual is viewed as an active participant in a behavioral change process. Accordingly, personal and social motivation and behavioral skills are essential for initiating and maintaining health behaviors (lymphedema risk reduction behaviors). A cross-sectional design was used to collect data from 136 patients using a Demographic and Medical Information interview tool, Knowledge Test, and Lymphedema Risk Reduction: Motivation and Behavioral Skill, and Lymphedema Risk Reduction Behavior Checklist. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, correlation coefficients, and regression. Participants with higher lymphedema knowledge had significantly higher behavioral skills (r=0.48; p&lt;0.000); and significantly higher behavioral skills are associated with higher personal motivation (r=0.371; p&lt;0.000) and social motivation (r=0.628; p&lt;0.000). Importantly, more risk reduction behaviors were reported by participants with higher knowledge (r=0.49; p&lt;0.000), higher behavioral skills (r=0.328; p&lt;0.000), higher personal motivation (r=0.448; p&lt;0.000) and social motivation (r=0.338; p&lt;0.000). Knowledge is a significant predictor for behavioral skills while personal motivation for practice of risk reduction behaviors. Findings of the study underscore that provision of lymphedema information is a critical dimension of risk reduction. Nurses and other healthcare professionals should consider taking initiatives to provide patients with adequate information to enhance lymphedema risk reduction.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:08Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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