SYMPTOM CLUSTERS AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN KOREAN PATIENTS WITH HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA

16.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164965
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SYMPTOM CLUSTERS AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN KOREAN PATIENTS WITH HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA
Author(s):
Fu, Mei; Ryu, Eunjung; Kim, Kyunghee; Chung-Ang U.; Cho, Sook; Sungkyunkwan U.; Kwon, In Gak
Author Details:
Mei Fu, RN, PhD, ACNS-BC, Assistant Professor, New York University, New York, New York, USA, email: mf67@nyu.edu; Eunjung Ryu, RN, PhD, Dept. of Nrsg., Konkuk U., Seoul, South Korea; Kyunghee Kim, RN, PhD, Dept. of Nrsg., Chung-Ang U., Seoul, South Korea; Myung Sook Cho, RN, PhD, Dept. of Clinical Nrsg. Sci., Samsung Med. Ctr., Sungkyunkwan U., Seoul, South Korea; In Gak Kwon, RN, PhD
Abstract:
Research Study: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common malignancy worldwide, causing about one million deaths annually. Patients with HCC usually reported multiple concurrent symptoms. Understanding the synergistic effect of concurrent symptoms holds promise to develop effective strategies capable of ameliorating specific groups of treatment- and disease-related symptoms so as to reduce the impact of cancer and to improve patients' quality of life (QOL). Limited studies have addressed symptoms and quality of life in patients with HCC yet the impact of possible symptom clusters on patients' QOL and mood has not been explored. This study explored whether multiple concurrent symptoms are clustered into groups of symptoms and to explore the effect of symptom clusters on the quality of life (QOL) in patients with HCC. The study was based on a conceptual framework of symptom clusters which emphasizes on the synergistic effect of symptom clusters. A multivariate approach with a cross-sectional design was used in the study. The study was conducted in Korea. A sample of 180 patients with HCC at a medical center in Seoul Korea was recruited from July to October 2008. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire, a Symptom Checklist, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary. Factor analysis and cluster analysis were used to identify symptom clusters based on the severity of patients' symptom experiences and patient subgroup. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, Chi-square and Fisher's exact test were also conducted. Four symptom clusters were identified: Pain-Appetite, Fatigue- Related, Gastrointestinal, and Itching-Constipation. Two patient subgroups were identified through cluster analysis: high and low symptom group. Patients in the high symptom group had significantly poorer functional status and poorer QOL in all the domains with the exception of social well-being. The differences between the two patient subgroups were not only statistically but also clinically significant. Patients in the high symptom group were also statistically and clinically anxious and depressed. Further research is needed to explore whether compositions of symptom cluster phenotypes vary over time and whether the associations of symptom clusters with QOL and mood are changing along the disease and treatment trajectory as well as symptom status.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSYMPTOM CLUSTERS AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN KOREAN PATIENTS WITH HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMAen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFu, Meien_US
dc.contributor.authorRyu, Eunjungen_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Kyungheeen_US
dc.contributor.authorChung-Ang U.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCho, Sooken_US
dc.contributor.authorSungkyunkwan U.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKwon, In Gaken_US
dc.author.detailsMei Fu, RN, PhD, ACNS-BC, Assistant Professor, New York University, New York, New York, USA, email: mf67@nyu.edu; Eunjung Ryu, RN, PhD, Dept. of Nrsg., Konkuk U., Seoul, South Korea; Kyunghee Kim, RN, PhD, Dept. of Nrsg., Chung-Ang U., Seoul, South Korea; Myung Sook Cho, RN, PhD, Dept. of Clinical Nrsg. Sci., Samsung Med. Ctr., Sungkyunkwan U., Seoul, South Korea; In Gak Kwon, RN, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164965-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common malignancy worldwide, causing about one million deaths annually. Patients with HCC usually reported multiple concurrent symptoms. Understanding the synergistic effect of concurrent symptoms holds promise to develop effective strategies capable of ameliorating specific groups of treatment- and disease-related symptoms so as to reduce the impact of cancer and to improve patients' quality of life (QOL). Limited studies have addressed symptoms and quality of life in patients with HCC yet the impact of possible symptom clusters on patients' QOL and mood has not been explored. This study explored whether multiple concurrent symptoms are clustered into groups of symptoms and to explore the effect of symptom clusters on the quality of life (QOL) in patients with HCC. The study was based on a conceptual framework of symptom clusters which emphasizes on the synergistic effect of symptom clusters. A multivariate approach with a cross-sectional design was used in the study. The study was conducted in Korea. A sample of 180 patients with HCC at a medical center in Seoul Korea was recruited from July to October 2008. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire, a Symptom Checklist, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary. Factor analysis and cluster analysis were used to identify symptom clusters based on the severity of patients' symptom experiences and patient subgroup. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, Chi-square and Fisher's exact test were also conducted. Four symptom clusters were identified: Pain-Appetite, Fatigue- Related, Gastrointestinal, and Itching-Constipation. Two patient subgroups were identified through cluster analysis: high and low symptom group. Patients in the high symptom group had significantly poorer functional status and poorer QOL in all the domains with the exception of social well-being. The differences between the two patient subgroups were not only statistically but also clinically significant. Patients in the high symptom group were also statistically and clinically anxious and depressed. Further research is needed to explore whether compositions of symptom cluster phenotypes vary over time and whether the associations of symptom clusters with QOL and mood are changing along the disease and treatment trajectory as well as symptom status.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:09Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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