2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164966
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breast Cancer Survivors' Experiences of Lymphedema-Related Symptoms
Author(s):
Fu, Mei
Author Details:
Mei Fu, RN, PhD, ACNS-BC, Assistant Professor, New York University, New York, New York, USA, email:mf67@nyu.edu
Abstract:
Research Study: Lymphedema or persistent swelling is a serious chronic condition from breast cancer treatment. Approximately 30% of the 2.4 million breast cancer survivors in the US developed lymphedema. While significant prevalence of ongoing multiple symptom experience of breast cancer survivors with lymphedema have been reported, there has been little research examining how women perceive ongoing multiple symptom experiences. The study aimed to describe symptom experiences of breast cancer survivors with lymphedema. Descriptive phenomenology is the qualitative approach used to uncover breast cancer survivors' perceptions and to describe their symptom experiences. A qualitative research design with a descriptive phenomenological method was used to develop a bracket, gathering data, and analyzing data. A sample of 34 participants were recruited in the Midwest and eastern US. Three in-depth interviews were conducted with each participant, a total of 102 interviews were completed, audiotaped, and transcribed. Interview transcripts and field notes were the data sources for this analysis, which was part of three larger studies. Data were analyzed to identify the essential themes within and across cases. Thirty-four female breast cancer survivors participated in the study: 10 were white, 11 were African-American, and 13 Chinese- American. Participants described their experiences of multiple distressing symptoms related to lymphedema. On a daily basis, the women experienced at least three to ten of symptoms along with swelling. Three essential themes were derived: (a) Living with perpetual discomfort; (b) Confronting the unexpected; (c) Losing pre-cancer being; and (d) Feeling handicapped. Distress was heightened when women expected symptoms to disappear but instead, symptoms became a perpetual discomfort. Moreover, distress was intensified when symptoms created sudden and unexpected situations or when symptoms elicited feelings of loss of pre-cancer being and feelings of being handicapped. Findings suggest that symptom distress has temporal, situational and attributive dimensions. Care for breast cancer survivors with lymphedema should foster dialogue about living with symptoms including ways that symptoms can emerge, and unexpected situations can occur. Prospective studies are needed to examine symptom distress in terms of temporal, situational, and attributive dimensions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreast Cancer Survivors' Experiences of Lymphedema-Related Symptomsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFu, Meien_US
dc.author.detailsMei Fu, RN, PhD, ACNS-BC, Assistant Professor, New York University, New York, New York, USA, email:mf67@nyu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164966-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Lymphedema or persistent swelling is a serious chronic condition from breast cancer treatment. Approximately 30% of the 2.4 million breast cancer survivors in the US developed lymphedema. While significant prevalence of ongoing multiple symptom experience of breast cancer survivors with lymphedema have been reported, there has been little research examining how women perceive ongoing multiple symptom experiences. The study aimed to describe symptom experiences of breast cancer survivors with lymphedema. Descriptive phenomenology is the qualitative approach used to uncover breast cancer survivors' perceptions and to describe their symptom experiences. A qualitative research design with a descriptive phenomenological method was used to develop a bracket, gathering data, and analyzing data. A sample of 34 participants were recruited in the Midwest and eastern US. Three in-depth interviews were conducted with each participant, a total of 102 interviews were completed, audiotaped, and transcribed. Interview transcripts and field notes were the data sources for this analysis, which was part of three larger studies. Data were analyzed to identify the essential themes within and across cases. Thirty-four female breast cancer survivors participated in the study: 10 were white, 11 were African-American, and 13 Chinese- American. Participants described their experiences of multiple distressing symptoms related to lymphedema. On a daily basis, the women experienced at least three to ten of symptoms along with swelling. Three essential themes were derived: (a) Living with perpetual discomfort; (b) Confronting the unexpected; (c) Losing pre-cancer being; and (d) Feeling handicapped. Distress was heightened when women expected symptoms to disappear but instead, symptoms became a perpetual discomfort. Moreover, distress was intensified when symptoms created sudden and unexpected situations or when symptoms elicited feelings of loss of pre-cancer being and feelings of being handicapped. Findings suggest that symptom distress has temporal, situational and attributive dimensions. Care for breast cancer survivors with lymphedema should foster dialogue about living with symptoms including ways that symptoms can emerge, and unexpected situations can occur. Prospective studies are needed to examine symptom distress in terms of temporal, situational, and attributive dimensions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:10Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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