2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164968
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Blood Culture Contamination: Results of a Performance Improvement Team¥
Author(s):
Geddie, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Geddie, RN, MS, AOCNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Orlando Regional Medical Center, Orlando, Florida, USA, email: Patricia.Geddie@orlandohealth.org
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Oncology patients are vulnerable for infection related to immunosuppression from chemotherapy. Blood cultures (BC) are the most important diagnostic tool for diagnosing an infectious etiology, obtain pathogens for identification, and optimization of antimicrobial therapy. The College of American Pathologists (CAP) strongly recommend that BC contamination rates be less than 2.5%. Patients often present to the Emergency Department (ED) with fever resulting in a sepsis work-up. With numerous and competing priorities on nursing time and workload, the accuracy of BC collection techniques are compromised. The purpose of this project was to improve BC contamination rates, to improve the collection process for BCs using the latest evidence, and improve knowledge level of nurses on the key elements leading to BC contamination. The laboratory and nursing department developed and implemented a plan to evaluate current processes and identify failure modes and gaps to improve outcomes. A 3 month pilot was conducted in the ED with a dedicated phlebotomist. The adult oncology units and trauma unit were also pilot units. Intensive education with emphasis on rationale and patient outcomes were provided to the nursing staff. Contamination rates and collecting nurse are matched and tracked via the hospitalÆs electronic record for follow-up and counseling. The policy and procedure, orientation, computer assisted instruction and annual clinical review exam was revised and distributed. The use of a dedicated phlebotomist in the ED substantially reduced contamination rate, impacting the overall ED and organization rate. As a result, the laboratory has planned to hire full time phebotomists for all lab draws in the ED. The inpatient units will continued to be tracked via performance improvement team and posted electronically for manager access. Collaboration is necessary to ensure accurate diagnosis of infections resulting in appropriate treatment and overall satisfactory patient outcomes. Education alone does not change practice. An emphasis of the rationale behind the procedure, consequences of contamination and accountability are necessary to change practice and the culture of safety. Provision of a well-trained and dedicated professionals to perform BCs does improve the degree of BC contamination.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBlood Culture Contamination: Results of a Performance Improvement Team¥en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGeddie, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Geddie, RN, MS, AOCNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Orlando Regional Medical Center, Orlando, Florida, USA, email: Patricia.Geddie@orlandohealth.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164968-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Oncology patients are vulnerable for infection related to immunosuppression from chemotherapy. Blood cultures (BC) are the most important diagnostic tool for diagnosing an infectious etiology, obtain pathogens for identification, and optimization of antimicrobial therapy. The College of American Pathologists (CAP) strongly recommend that BC contamination rates be less than 2.5%. Patients often present to the Emergency Department (ED) with fever resulting in a sepsis work-up. With numerous and competing priorities on nursing time and workload, the accuracy of BC collection techniques are compromised. The purpose of this project was to improve BC contamination rates, to improve the collection process for BCs using the latest evidence, and improve knowledge level of nurses on the key elements leading to BC contamination. The laboratory and nursing department developed and implemented a plan to evaluate current processes and identify failure modes and gaps to improve outcomes. A 3 month pilot was conducted in the ED with a dedicated phlebotomist. The adult oncology units and trauma unit were also pilot units. Intensive education with emphasis on rationale and patient outcomes were provided to the nursing staff. Contamination rates and collecting nurse are matched and tracked via the hospitalÆs electronic record for follow-up and counseling. The policy and procedure, orientation, computer assisted instruction and annual clinical review exam was revised and distributed. The use of a dedicated phlebotomist in the ED substantially reduced contamination rate, impacting the overall ED and organization rate. As a result, the laboratory has planned to hire full time phebotomists for all lab draws in the ED. The inpatient units will continued to be tracked via performance improvement team and posted electronically for manager access. Collaboration is necessary to ensure accurate diagnosis of infections resulting in appropriate treatment and overall satisfactory patient outcomes. Education alone does not change practice. An emphasis of the rationale behind the procedure, consequences of contamination and accountability are necessary to change practice and the culture of safety. Provision of a well-trained and dedicated professionals to perform BCs does improve the degree of BC contamination.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:12Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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