Fact or Fiction: An implanted venous access device when not in use must be flushed monthly to maintain patency?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164969
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fact or Fiction: An implanted venous access device when not in use must be flushed monthly to maintain patency?
Author(s):
Gholz, Ruth; Whitehill, Nancy; Franer, Kelly
Author Details:
Ruth Gholz, RN, MS, AOCN, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Cincinnati VAMC, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: gholzcanty@fuse.net; Nancy Whitehill, RN, MSN, AOCNS, CRNI, Mercy Health Partners, Fairfield, Ohio; Kelly Franer, RN, MS, OCN, Mercy Health Partners, Cincinnati, Ohio
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Significance and Background: The use of implanted ports in the ambulatory oncology setting has become a standard of care. Policies and procedures are written using evidence in the management of these devices. In 2006 Cancer Care Ontario completed and published "Managing central venous access devices in cancer patients: a clinical practice guideline," an evidence based series report. This guideline recommends that an implanted venous device (e.g., Port a cath) is flushed with 5ml 100u/ml heparin q4 weeks when the port is not in use. On review there was no scientific data to support this recommendation other than the manufacturer. The purpose was to describe practices in three ambulatory hospital based practices in Cincinnati, OH, that have challenged this recommendation and flush implanted venous ports every two to three months. Methods: Random reviews of 30 charts per clinic setting were completed. Criteria for inclusion were oncology patients with solid tumors and implanted venous ports that had completed their course of chemotherapy and needed port maintenance. Analysis: Ninety patients received flushing of venous port every two to three months with less than five patients with a port flush longer than a six month interval. Findings: Various types of implantable venous ports were utilized, each clinic had different policies and procedures, with one clinic using a saline flush and two clinics using the standard heparin flush. The outcomes of this review will be described including type of venous port, frequency of flush, blood return, trouble shooting and any complications as well as patient satisfaction. Implications for Nursing: Maintenance of venous ports requires oncology nurse's coordination of visits and trouble shooting of problems. If the patient visits were reduced to every three months the cost of health care would decrease, infections would decrease and precious nursing time would be maximized. This is one small review and warrants further investigation. We challenge the manufacturers of these products to publish the rationale used for venous port maintenance recommendations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFact or Fiction: An implanted venous access device when not in use must be flushed monthly to maintain patency?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGholz, Ruthen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitehill, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.authorFraner, Kellyen_US
dc.author.detailsRuth Gholz, RN, MS, AOCN, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Cincinnati VAMC, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: gholzcanty@fuse.net; Nancy Whitehill, RN, MSN, AOCNS, CRNI, Mercy Health Partners, Fairfield, Ohio; Kelly Franer, RN, MS, OCN, Mercy Health Partners, Cincinnati, Ohioen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164969-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Significance and Background: The use of implanted ports in the ambulatory oncology setting has become a standard of care. Policies and procedures are written using evidence in the management of these devices. In 2006 Cancer Care Ontario completed and published "Managing central venous access devices in cancer patients: a clinical practice guideline," an evidence based series report. This guideline recommends that an implanted venous device (e.g., Port a cath) is flushed with 5ml 100u/ml heparin q4 weeks when the port is not in use. On review there was no scientific data to support this recommendation other than the manufacturer. The purpose was to describe practices in three ambulatory hospital based practices in Cincinnati, OH, that have challenged this recommendation and flush implanted venous ports every two to three months. Methods: Random reviews of 30 charts per clinic setting were completed. Criteria for inclusion were oncology patients with solid tumors and implanted venous ports that had completed their course of chemotherapy and needed port maintenance. Analysis: Ninety patients received flushing of venous port every two to three months with less than five patients with a port flush longer than a six month interval. Findings: Various types of implantable venous ports were utilized, each clinic had different policies and procedures, with one clinic using a saline flush and two clinics using the standard heparin flush. The outcomes of this review will be described including type of venous port, frequency of flush, blood return, trouble shooting and any complications as well as patient satisfaction. Implications for Nursing: Maintenance of venous ports requires oncology nurse's coordination of visits and trouble shooting of problems. If the patient visits were reduced to every three months the cost of health care would decrease, infections would decrease and precious nursing time would be maximized. This is one small review and warrants further investigation. We challenge the manufacturers of these products to publish the rationale used for venous port maintenance recommendations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:13Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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