Symptom patterns and physical functioning before and after surgery for lung cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164972
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Symptom patterns and physical functioning before and after surgery for lung cancer
Author(s):
Ginex, Pamela; Jingeleski, Maureen; Wickersham, Cathy; Vincent, Alain; Thom, Bridgette
Author Details:
Pamela Ginex, RN, MPH, EdD, OCN, Research Nurse, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: ginexp@mskcc.org; Maureen Jingeleski, BSN; Cathy Wickersham, BSN, OCN; Alain Vincent, BS; and Bridgette Thom, MS
Abstract:
Research Study: Little is known about the impact of curative surgical resection on symptom pattern and physical function of patients with lung cancer. Preliminary evidence has shown that changes are seen in physical and functional health status, particularly in the level of postoperative pain and dyspnea. The persistence of these changes varies in the literature and information on symptom patterns and physical functioning of these patients is needed. This study is a secondary analysis of data from a study of quality of life (QOL) in patients with lung cancer undergoing surgery. The purpose was to assess physical functioning and symptom patterns over time. The Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms guided this study. The theory postulates that physiologic, psychological, and situational factors interact with each other and with symptoms to define the overall symptom experience. Ninety-three patients were assessed at baseline (pre-operative), post operative (n=82), and at 4 (n=60), 8 (n=40), and/or 12 (n=24) months post surgery. Patients completed the SF-36 Health Survey as well as the Brief Pain Inventory, Brief Fatigue Inventory, and the Baseline Dyspnea Index. Clinical variables and demographic data were also collected. One-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference in physical functioning (p<0.001), dyspnea (p=0.005), and pain (p<0.001) by time point. Physical functioning scores were highest at baseline (74.03, sd=25.23) and dropped significantly following surgery (58.68, sd=21.72), recovering at four months (69.75, sd=22.10), never returning to baseline (71.25 at eight months, 71.46 at 12 months). Additional analyses will be presented. NursesÆ awareness of the potential loss of physical functioning after surgery and the impact on quality of life is important for appropriate patient care planning. These results contribute to our knowledge of lung cancer survivors which is essential for maximizing patientÆs ability to adapt to changes and achieve the best quality of life possible.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSymptom patterns and physical functioning before and after surgery for lung canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorGinex, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJingeleski, Maureenen_US
dc.contributor.authorWickersham, Cathyen_US
dc.contributor.authorVincent, Alainen_US
dc.contributor.authorThom, Bridgetteen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Ginex, RN, MPH, EdD, OCN, Research Nurse, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: ginexp@mskcc.org; Maureen Jingeleski, BSN; Cathy Wickersham, BSN, OCN; Alain Vincent, BS; and Bridgette Thom, MSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164972-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Little is known about the impact of curative surgical resection on symptom pattern and physical function of patients with lung cancer. Preliminary evidence has shown that changes are seen in physical and functional health status, particularly in the level of postoperative pain and dyspnea. The persistence of these changes varies in the literature and information on symptom patterns and physical functioning of these patients is needed. This study is a secondary analysis of data from a study of quality of life (QOL) in patients with lung cancer undergoing surgery. The purpose was to assess physical functioning and symptom patterns over time. The Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms guided this study. The theory postulates that physiologic, psychological, and situational factors interact with each other and with symptoms to define the overall symptom experience. Ninety-three patients were assessed at baseline (pre-operative), post operative (n=82), and at 4 (n=60), 8 (n=40), and/or 12 (n=24) months post surgery. Patients completed the SF-36 Health Survey as well as the Brief Pain Inventory, Brief Fatigue Inventory, and the Baseline Dyspnea Index. Clinical variables and demographic data were also collected. One-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference in physical functioning (p&lt;0.001), dyspnea (p=0.005), and pain (p&lt;0.001) by time point. Physical functioning scores were highest at baseline (74.03, sd=25.23) and dropped significantly following surgery (58.68, sd=21.72), recovering at four months (69.75, sd=22.10), never returning to baseline (71.25 at eight months, 71.46 at 12 months). Additional analyses will be presented. Nurses&AElig; awareness of the potential loss of physical functioning after surgery and the impact on quality of life is important for appropriate patient care planning. These results contribute to our knowledge of lung cancer survivors which is essential for maximizing patient&AElig;s ability to adapt to changes and achieve the best quality of life possible.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:16Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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