2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164974
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IMPACT OF AN EDUCATION AND SUPPORT PROGRAM ON ONCOLOGY SUPPORT STAFF
Author(s):
Goodman, Paula; Miller, Linda; Jenna Shea, Jenna
Author Details:
Paula Goodman, OCN, Staff Nurse, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA, email: rpgoodman@aol.com; Linda Miller, RN, BSN, MSN; Jenna Shea, RN, BSN
Abstract:
Research Study: Care of the cancer patient encompasses management of physical and psychosocial needs, throughout the continuum of the illness. Healthcare providers in an oncology setting often develop long-term relationships with the patients/families. There are rewards but the demanding nature of this work can have an impact on levels of stress, job satisfaction and burnout. Care teams include nursing assistants, and clinical technicians, non-licensed personnel who provide comfort care; and unit secretaries, who are a crucial link in the chain of communication for optimal care. Research has documented the emotional impact of this care for nurses, physicians and other health care professionals and programs to enhance coping strategies for this group. There is little or no evidence of the effects of coping strategies on oncology support staff, the 'forgotten team members.' The purpose was to measure impact of a formalized education and support program on the oncology support staff at an academic hospital. This study builds on the conceptual/theoretical framework that cancer care is stressful. If the challenges inherent in the oncology environment are addressed, job satisfaction will be positive. This descriptive study uses questionnaire/survey to establish baseline values and measure the impact of a targeted educational/ support program on job satisfaction, work relationships, personal accomplishment and emotional exhaustion for the support staff. Methodology: 1) pre-program Work Experience Survey with demographic data and drawn from Cashavelly 1, Ulrich 2 and the Maslach Burnout Inventory 3 ; 2) Three sessions: a) an educational program on cancer as a disease, symptom management and end-of-life care; and b) two support group sessions including discussion of patient/family relationships, coping with death and dying, value and recognition from professional staff, balancing job role and emotional impact of the job; 3) post-program Work Experience Survey . Descriptive statistics will be used for the pre/ post surveys. Comparative analysis will determine the impact of the program on baseline measures. Pre/post program analysis will be completed after the final session. Feedback from the stressed staff is the sessions thus far have been helpful.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIMPACT OF AN EDUCATION AND SUPPORT PROGRAM ON ONCOLOGY SUPPORT STAFFen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Paulaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorJenna Shea, Jennaen_US
dc.author.detailsPaula Goodman, OCN, Staff Nurse, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA, email: rpgoodman@aol.com; Linda Miller, RN, BSN, MSN; Jenna Shea, RN, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164974-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Care of the cancer patient encompasses management of physical and psychosocial needs, throughout the continuum of the illness. Healthcare providers in an oncology setting often develop long-term relationships with the patients/families. There are rewards but the demanding nature of this work can have an impact on levels of stress, job satisfaction and burnout. Care teams include nursing assistants, and clinical technicians, non-licensed personnel who provide comfort care; and unit secretaries, who are a crucial link in the chain of communication for optimal care. Research has documented the emotional impact of this care for nurses, physicians and other health care professionals and programs to enhance coping strategies for this group. There is little or no evidence of the effects of coping strategies on oncology support staff, the 'forgotten team members.' The purpose was to measure impact of a formalized education and support program on the oncology support staff at an academic hospital. This study builds on the conceptual/theoretical framework that cancer care is stressful. If the challenges inherent in the oncology environment are addressed, job satisfaction will be positive. This descriptive study uses questionnaire/survey to establish baseline values and measure the impact of a targeted educational/ support program on job satisfaction, work relationships, personal accomplishment and emotional exhaustion for the support staff. Methodology: 1) pre-program Work Experience Survey with demographic data and drawn from Cashavelly 1, Ulrich 2 and the Maslach Burnout Inventory 3 ; 2) Three sessions: a) an educational program on cancer as a disease, symptom management and end-of-life care; and b) two support group sessions including discussion of patient/family relationships, coping with death and dying, value and recognition from professional staff, balancing job role and emotional impact of the job; 3) post-program Work Experience Survey . Descriptive statistics will be used for the pre/ post surveys. Comparative analysis will determine the impact of the program on baseline measures. Pre/post program analysis will be completed after the final session. Feedback from the stressed staff is the sessions thus far have been helpful.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:18Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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