Quality of Life in Colorectal Cancer Survivors as Identified by Gender-specific Focus Groups

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164976
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life in Colorectal Cancer Survivors as Identified by Gender-specific Focus Groups
Author(s):
Grant, Marcia; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Herrinton, Lisa J.; McMullen, Carmit K. Altschuler, Andrea
Author Details:
Marcia Grant, RN, DNSc, FAAN, Director and Professor, City of Hope, Duarte, California, USA, email: mgrant@coh.org; Mark C. Hornbrook, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Portland, Oregon; Lisa J. Herrinton, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Northern California; Carmit K. McMullen, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Portland; Andrea Altschuler, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Northern California
Abstract:
Research Study: Many of the 1.1 million persons alive in the US with a history of colorectal cancer (CRC) have received temporary or permanent ostomies. Understanding how lifelong fecal incontinence affects quality of life (QOL) can provide the basis for education and support of this population. The purpose of this study is to understand QOL concerns of CRC survivors with ostomies as identified by gender-specific focus groups. The four dimensions (physical, psychological, social and spiritual) QOL model from City of Hope provided the framework for the quantitative QOL questionnaire, and focus group content analysis. This multisite, multidisciplinary mixed methods study had two phases: a mailed CR-QOL survey and focus groups to examine barriers and coping strategies of long-term CRC survivors. Respondents from two Kaiser Permanente Regions (Northern California and Northwest) were eligible if 18 years or older and diagnosed with CRC at least five years prior. The 286 respondents with ostomies were divided, based on their overall QOL score into the highest (HQOL) and lowest (LQOL) quartiles. Based on gender, quartile participants were invited to focus groups. Eight groups resulted: four HQOL groups, two for men and two for women and four LQOL groups, two for men and two for women. Content analysis of the transcripts was conducted by the research team using the COH model and HyperRESEARCH. Coding was done by the entire research team, validated by two investigators, and finalized as a group when discordant coding occurred. Comments from HQOL groups addressed fewer codes within each of the four QOL dimensions then did the LQOL groups. Females had a greater number of comments across codes than males. Social well-being had the most comments and the spiritual wellbeing had the least. Dietary issues, clothing changes, sexuality, and travel issues were common across groups. Sleep issues were more commonly discussed in the female groups, and body image was only discussed in the LQOL female group. Qualitative data validated the survey. Results can be used to design the content and approach to test psychoeducational interventions for CRC patients with ostomies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life in Colorectal Cancer Survivors as Identified by Gender-specific Focus Groupsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Marciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHornbrook, Mark C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHerrinton, Lisa J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcMullen, Carmit K. Altschuler, Andreaen_US
dc.author.detailsMarcia Grant, RN, DNSc, FAAN, Director and Professor, City of Hope, Duarte, California, USA, email: mgrant@coh.org; Mark C. Hornbrook, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Portland, Oregon; Lisa J. Herrinton, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Northern California; Carmit K. McMullen, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Portland; Andrea Altschuler, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Northern Californiaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164976-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Many of the 1.1 million persons alive in the US with a history of colorectal cancer (CRC) have received temporary or permanent ostomies. Understanding how lifelong fecal incontinence affects quality of life (QOL) can provide the basis for education and support of this population. The purpose of this study is to understand QOL concerns of CRC survivors with ostomies as identified by gender-specific focus groups. The four dimensions (physical, psychological, social and spiritual) QOL model from City of Hope provided the framework for the quantitative QOL questionnaire, and focus group content analysis. This multisite, multidisciplinary mixed methods study had two phases: a mailed CR-QOL survey and focus groups to examine barriers and coping strategies of long-term CRC survivors. Respondents from two Kaiser Permanente Regions (Northern California and Northwest) were eligible if 18 years or older and diagnosed with CRC at least five years prior. The 286 respondents with ostomies were divided, based on their overall QOL score into the highest (HQOL) and lowest (LQOL) quartiles. Based on gender, quartile participants were invited to focus groups. Eight groups resulted: four HQOL groups, two for men and two for women and four LQOL groups, two for men and two for women. Content analysis of the transcripts was conducted by the research team using the COH model and HyperRESEARCH. Coding was done by the entire research team, validated by two investigators, and finalized as a group when discordant coding occurred. Comments from HQOL groups addressed fewer codes within each of the four QOL dimensions then did the LQOL groups. Females had a greater number of comments across codes than males. Social well-being had the most comments and the spiritual wellbeing had the least. Dietary issues, clothing changes, sexuality, and travel issues were common across groups. Sleep issues were more commonly discussed in the female groups, and body image was only discussed in the LQOL female group. Qualitative data validated the survey. Results can be used to design the content and approach to test psychoeducational interventions for CRC patients with ostomies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:20Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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