How do women with breast cancer rate cognitive function: The importance and implications as reported by 1071 patients in a web-based survey?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164982
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How do women with breast cancer rate cognitive function: The importance and implications as reported by 1071 patients in a web-based survey?
Author(s):
Hollen, Patricia; Davis, Beverly; Horigan, Jennifer; Petersen, Judy; Gralla, Richard
Author Details:
Patricia Hollen, PhD, RN, FAAN, Boyd Professor of Nursing, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: p.hollen@virginia.edu; Beverly Davis, RN, MN, AOCN, NexCura, Seattle, Washington; Jennifer Horigan, NP, RN, OCN, North Shore-LIJ Health System, New York; Judy Petersen, RN, MN, AOCN, NexCura, Seattle, Washington; Kenda Burg, NexCura, Seattle, Washington; Richard Gralla, MD, North Shore-LIJ, New York
Abstract:
Research Study: Difficulties in cognitive function, specifically memory or the ability to concentrate, have been the subject of research and controversy. Cognitive difficulties have been associated with chemotherapy and other treatments for breast cancer. While many causes of these problems have been proposed, including biological and psychological factors, strong evidence is lacking. In this survey, we sought the opinions of women with breast cancer to ascertain how these women rated the ability to concentrate among 21 major issues, based on a quality of life change model for cancer. We used the established patient base of the web-based NexCura information resource to survey registered patients with breast cancer. Demographic stratifications included disease stage, age, menopausal status, time since diagnosis, prior/current treatment with surgery, RT, chemotherapy, hormonal, targeted, and CAM approaches. 1,071 women (median age 53, 65% stage I, 43% > 2 years since diagnosis) completed the anonymous web-conducted survey. Patients ranked the importance of 21 issues on a 5-point scale. Issues included general, physical, functional, psychosocial and summative items. The 1,071 women ranked the ability to concentrate as one of the four most important factors, as determined by those who rated it in the top category (very important, 65%) and the top 2 importance categories (97%). It followed only overall quality of life in the ôvery importantö category, and was tied with maintaining independence and the ability to sleep in the sum of the top 2 importance categories. Analysis is being conducted to determine if ratings by breast cancer subsets (newly diagnosed, on treatment, NED, hormonal or non-hormonal treatment, metastatic disease, survivors) will differ. These results from one of the largest groups of breast cancer patients surveyed to date support the belief that women value the ability to concentrate most highly. Interference with concentration can affect nearly every aspect of functioning and quality of life, and can have an impact on quality decision making. Regardless of whether causes of cognitive impairment have supporting evidence, oncology nurses should be aware of the level of importance of concentration to patients with breast cancer and report symptoms related to executive function.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Philanthropic funds.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow do women with breast cancer rate cognitive function: The importance and implications as reported by 1071 patients in a web-based survey?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHollen, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Beverlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorHorigan, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorPetersen, Judyen_US
dc.contributor.authorGralla, Richarden_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Hollen, PhD, RN, FAAN, Boyd Professor of Nursing, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: p.hollen@virginia.edu; Beverly Davis, RN, MN, AOCN, NexCura, Seattle, Washington; Jennifer Horigan, NP, RN, OCN, North Shore-LIJ Health System, New York; Judy Petersen, RN, MN, AOCN, NexCura, Seattle, Washington; Kenda Burg, NexCura, Seattle, Washington; Richard Gralla, MD, North Shore-LIJ, New Yorken_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164982-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Difficulties in cognitive function, specifically memory or the ability to concentrate, have been the subject of research and controversy. Cognitive difficulties have been associated with chemotherapy and other treatments for breast cancer. While many causes of these problems have been proposed, including biological and psychological factors, strong evidence is lacking. In this survey, we sought the opinions of women with breast cancer to ascertain how these women rated the ability to concentrate among 21 major issues, based on a quality of life change model for cancer. We used the established patient base of the web-based NexCura information resource to survey registered patients with breast cancer. Demographic stratifications included disease stage, age, menopausal status, time since diagnosis, prior/current treatment with surgery, RT, chemotherapy, hormonal, targeted, and CAM approaches. 1,071 women (median age 53, 65% stage I, 43% > 2 years since diagnosis) completed the anonymous web-conducted survey. Patients ranked the importance of 21 issues on a 5-point scale. Issues included general, physical, functional, psychosocial and summative items. The 1,071 women ranked the ability to concentrate as one of the four most important factors, as determined by those who rated it in the top category (very important, 65%) and the top 2 importance categories (97%). It followed only overall quality of life in the ôvery importantö category, and was tied with maintaining independence and the ability to sleep in the sum of the top 2 importance categories. Analysis is being conducted to determine if ratings by breast cancer subsets (newly diagnosed, on treatment, NED, hormonal or non-hormonal treatment, metastatic disease, survivors) will differ. These results from one of the largest groups of breast cancer patients surveyed to date support the belief that women value the ability to concentrate most highly. Interference with concentration can affect nearly every aspect of functioning and quality of life, and can have an impact on quality decision making. Regardless of whether causes of cognitive impairment have supporting evidence, oncology nurses should be aware of the level of importance of concentration to patients with breast cancer and report symptoms related to executive function.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:27Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Philanthropic funds.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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