Finding Balance: Insights from Bereaved Caregivers of Palliative Cancer Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164983
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Finding Balance: Insights from Bereaved Caregivers of Palliative Cancer Patients
Author(s):
Holtslander, Lorraine; Bally, Jill
Author Details:
Lorraine Holtslander, RN, PhD, CHPCN, Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, lorraine.holtslander@usask.ca; Jill Bally, RN, MN
Abstract:
Research Study: Many older, family caregivers will face bereavement as a result of cancer deaths, which are increasing in proportion to an increasing and aging population. Many family caregivers are taking on complex and exhausting levels of responsibility, which may affect their transition through bereavement. While it is acknowledged that family caregivers require support that extends into the time of bereavement, very little is known about their journey or how they find balance in their completely changed lives. The purpose of the proposed research was to explore the experience and processes of "finding balance" for older, spousal, bereaved family caregivers of a palliative cancer patient. The specific aims were: a) to provide a conceptual understanding of the experience and processes of finding balance, b) to describe these definitions and processes within their social context, and c) to construct a substantive theory. The theory will provide a basis for the development of an intervention focused on the psychosocial needs of the bereaved family caregiver. Constructivist grounded theory methods provided the philosophical framework for the research. This study received approval from an institutional review board and the local health region's ethics committee. Ten open-ended, in-depth audio-taped interviews were conducted with five older adults, within their first year of bereavement after providing care to a spouse with terminal cancer. The participants completed diaries for 2 weeks, at which time a second interview was conducted. The interviews and diaries were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Finding balance was difficult, a daily struggle, but an important aspect of getting through the ups and downs of the bereavement experience. Balance was found each day in daily choices, conversations with supportive people, and finding ways to deal with difficult emotions. The participants focused on positive thoughts, making plans, and reaching out to others in need in their challenging daily lives. This emerging theory may facilitate healthy outcomes for family caregivers after the death of the palliative cancer patient. Oncology nurses can assess and monitor bereaved caregivers who may be at risk for or are losing balance, requiring individualized support and intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFinding Balance: Insights from Bereaved Caregivers of Palliative Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoltslander, Lorraineen_US
dc.contributor.authorBally, Jillen_US
dc.author.detailsLorraine Holtslander, RN, PhD, CHPCN, Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, lorraine.holtslander@usask.ca; Jill Bally, RN, MNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164983-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Many older, family caregivers will face bereavement as a result of cancer deaths, which are increasing in proportion to an increasing and aging population. Many family caregivers are taking on complex and exhausting levels of responsibility, which may affect their transition through bereavement. While it is acknowledged that family caregivers require support that extends into the time of bereavement, very little is known about their journey or how they find balance in their completely changed lives. The purpose of the proposed research was to explore the experience and processes of "finding balance" for older, spousal, bereaved family caregivers of a palliative cancer patient. The specific aims were: a) to provide a conceptual understanding of the experience and processes of finding balance, b) to describe these definitions and processes within their social context, and c) to construct a substantive theory. The theory will provide a basis for the development of an intervention focused on the psychosocial needs of the bereaved family caregiver. Constructivist grounded theory methods provided the philosophical framework for the research. This study received approval from an institutional review board and the local health region's ethics committee. Ten open-ended, in-depth audio-taped interviews were conducted with five older adults, within their first year of bereavement after providing care to a spouse with terminal cancer. The participants completed diaries for 2 weeks, at which time a second interview was conducted. The interviews and diaries were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Finding balance was difficult, a daily struggle, but an important aspect of getting through the ups and downs of the bereavement experience. Balance was found each day in daily choices, conversations with supportive people, and finding ways to deal with difficult emotions. The participants focused on positive thoughts, making plans, and reaching out to others in need in their challenging daily lives. This emerging theory may facilitate healthy outcomes for family caregivers after the death of the palliative cancer patient. Oncology nurses can assess and monitor bereaved caregivers who may be at risk for or are losing balance, requiring individualized support and intervention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:28Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.