Putting the "P" in Palliative: A Primer for Perfecting Personnel Performance

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164988
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Putting the "P" in Palliative: A Primer for Perfecting Personnel Performance
Author(s):
Idell, Cynthia; Kravits, Kate; McCormick, Jill
Author Details:
Cynthia Idell, RN, BA, MSN, AOCN, Professional Practice Leader, Medical Oncology, City of Hope, Duarte, California, USA, email: cidell@coh.org; Kate Kravits, RN, MA, LPC, ATR; Jill McCormick, RN, MSN, OCN
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: According to Gelfman, Meier and Morrison, palliative care is the interdisciplinary specialty that aims to relieve suffering and to improve quality of care for patients with serious illness. Palliative care programs are common in hospitals as patients and families desire relief from physical distress, control over health decisions, and prevention of death-prolonging procedures. Despite the presence of renowned palliative care experts at a west coast comprehensive cancer center, patient satisfaction surveys and staff needs assessment indicate care gaps remain in best palliative care practice. The purpose of this project was to analyze palliative care gaps within the institution and to pilot potential strategies designed to enhance staff palliative care knowledge while improving staff satisfaction, earlier hospice referrals, and decreasing re-admissions. An interdisciplinary team was established including physicians, social workers, psychologists, advanced practice nurses, researchers and staff nurses. The approach selected for the intervention utilized case studies and practical tools for staff. The Evidence-Based Nurse series set a precedent for this approach. An oncology inpatient setting was chosen as a pilot as a result of staff interest and due to the complex palliative care needs of advanced metastatic patients. Expert speakers presented topics identified by staff with nurse-sensitive outcomes, including: managing difficult patients; cognitive changes/delirium; self-care; sadness versus depression; intractable pain management; ethics of palliative care; and care for dying patients. Presented twice monthly, each session was a 20 minute presentation, 15 minute case study, and time to apply pearls to practice. Average series attendance was 25 from all disciplines. Post evaluations tracked short-term outcomes. Long-term outcomes included: time to hospice referral, tracking re-admissions for palliative care symptom management and Press-Ganey satisfaction scores. Palliative care education requests are below baseline year. Pending positive pilot outcomes, the palliative care series will be disseminated to other clinical areas. Devising an infrastructure to institutionalize best practice for palliative care remains an on-going challenge. A long-range, case-based educational series may not only satisfy professional knowledge but also serve to enhance patient satisfaction and reduce re-admissions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePutting the "P" in Palliative: A Primer for Perfecting Personnel Performanceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIdell, Cynthiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKravits, Kateen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCormick, Jillen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Idell, RN, BA, MSN, AOCN, Professional Practice Leader, Medical Oncology, City of Hope, Duarte, California, USA, email: cidell@coh.org; Kate Kravits, RN, MA, LPC, ATR; Jill McCormick, RN, MSN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164988-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: According to Gelfman, Meier and Morrison, palliative care is the interdisciplinary specialty that aims to relieve suffering and to improve quality of care for patients with serious illness. Palliative care programs are common in hospitals as patients and families desire relief from physical distress, control over health decisions, and prevention of death-prolonging procedures. Despite the presence of renowned palliative care experts at a west coast comprehensive cancer center, patient satisfaction surveys and staff needs assessment indicate care gaps remain in best palliative care practice. The purpose of this project was to analyze palliative care gaps within the institution and to pilot potential strategies designed to enhance staff palliative care knowledge while improving staff satisfaction, earlier hospice referrals, and decreasing re-admissions. An interdisciplinary team was established including physicians, social workers, psychologists, advanced practice nurses, researchers and staff nurses. The approach selected for the intervention utilized case studies and practical tools for staff. The Evidence-Based Nurse series set a precedent for this approach. An oncology inpatient setting was chosen as a pilot as a result of staff interest and due to the complex palliative care needs of advanced metastatic patients. Expert speakers presented topics identified by staff with nurse-sensitive outcomes, including: managing difficult patients; cognitive changes/delirium; self-care; sadness versus depression; intractable pain management; ethics of palliative care; and care for dying patients. Presented twice monthly, each session was a 20 minute presentation, 15 minute case study, and time to apply pearls to practice. Average series attendance was 25 from all disciplines. Post evaluations tracked short-term outcomes. Long-term outcomes included: time to hospice referral, tracking re-admissions for palliative care symptom management and Press-Ganey satisfaction scores. Palliative care education requests are below baseline year. Pending positive pilot outcomes, the palliative care series will be disseminated to other clinical areas. Devising an infrastructure to institutionalize best practice for palliative care remains an on-going challenge. A long-range, case-based educational series may not only satisfy professional knowledge but also serve to enhance patient satisfaction and reduce re-admissions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:33Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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