Strategies to Increase Staff Compliance with Use of Closed-System Drug Transfer Devices (CSTD)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164989
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies to Increase Staff Compliance with Use of Closed-System Drug Transfer Devices (CSTD)
Author(s):
Idell, Cynthia; Yost, Beverly; Bearman, Barbara; Gallardo, Mary
Author Details:
Cynthia Idell, RN, BA, MSN, AOCN, Professional Practice Leader, Medical Oncology, City of Hope, Duarte, California, USA, email: cidell@coh.org; Beverly Yost, RN, BSN, OCN; Barbara Bearman, RN; Mary Gallardo, RN, BSN, OCN
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Creating a safe work environment for healthcare workers requires a multiplicity of strategies to reduce exposure to hazardous drugs such as chemotherapy. Agencies recommend the use of a closed-system drug transfer device (CSTD) to prevent hazardous drug exposure. Chemotherapy aerosolization risk occurs as chemotherapy lines are flushed or during intravenous push of chemotherapy. Personnel training and available CSTD supplies do not ensure compliance with use. Adult learners must believe benefits outweigh any inconveniences posed by CSTD use. The purpose of this project was to improve staff safety during chemotherapy administration by increasing knowledge, awareness and utilization of CSTDs. A secondary goal was to revise the safe handling of hazardous agents policy to reflect recommendations for CSTD use. Three nurses selected aerosolization prevention by CSTD use as an Evidence-Based Nursing (EBN) project. Based on their literature review, staff created a ôtipsö sheet for peers and planned an educational campaign with return demonstration. Using staff knowledge survey results, the EBN champions devised an intensive educational effort with posters, staff inservices, and one-on-one demonstration of CSTDs. Staff were re-surveyed after two months to see if they adopted safe practices to decrease exposure, with increased CSTD use. A poster illustrating CSTD use was disseminated to clinical personnel unable to attend education sessions. A post-education measurement of staff knowledge was obtained. Significant gains were made in the areas of staff nurses believing they had been exposed to chemotherapy aerosolization (decreased 22%); 17% gain in nurses using CSTDÆs 100% of the time; a 14% increased comfort level with obtaining CSTDs and a 10% gain in expressed comfort level with CSTD use. The unit manager reported sustained gains in CSTD par level use over 2 months. The policy was revised. Many studies demonstrate that contact with hazardous agents can cause numerous problems for healthcare personnel. Staff must be educated intensively on potential risks of cytotoxic exposure and encouraged to use CSTDs to prevent aerosolization. An EBN project sustained over several months with multiple educational efforts and measures of before/after surveys of recipient beliefs and actions is one way to foster staff adherence to recommended guidelines.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies to Increase Staff Compliance with Use of Closed-System Drug Transfer Devices (CSTD)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorIdell, Cynthiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorYost, Beverlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorBearman, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorGallardo, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsCynthia Idell, RN, BA, MSN, AOCN, Professional Practice Leader, Medical Oncology, City of Hope, Duarte, California, USA, email: cidell@coh.org; Beverly Yost, RN, BSN, OCN; Barbara Bearman, RN; Mary Gallardo, RN, BSN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164989-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Creating a safe work environment for healthcare workers requires a multiplicity of strategies to reduce exposure to hazardous drugs such as chemotherapy. Agencies recommend the use of a closed-system drug transfer device (CSTD) to prevent hazardous drug exposure. Chemotherapy aerosolization risk occurs as chemotherapy lines are flushed or during intravenous push of chemotherapy. Personnel training and available CSTD supplies do not ensure compliance with use. Adult learners must believe benefits outweigh any inconveniences posed by CSTD use. The purpose of this project was to improve staff safety during chemotherapy administration by increasing knowledge, awareness and utilization of CSTDs. A secondary goal was to revise the safe handling of hazardous agents policy to reflect recommendations for CSTD use. Three nurses selected aerosolization prevention by CSTD use as an Evidence-Based Nursing (EBN) project. Based on their literature review, staff created a ôtipsö sheet for peers and planned an educational campaign with return demonstration. Using staff knowledge survey results, the EBN champions devised an intensive educational effort with posters, staff inservices, and one-on-one demonstration of CSTDs. Staff were re-surveyed after two months to see if they adopted safe practices to decrease exposure, with increased CSTD use. A poster illustrating CSTD use was disseminated to clinical personnel unable to attend education sessions. A post-education measurement of staff knowledge was obtained. Significant gains were made in the areas of staff nurses believing they had been exposed to chemotherapy aerosolization (decreased 22%); 17% gain in nurses using CSTDÆs 100% of the time; a 14% increased comfort level with obtaining CSTDs and a 10% gain in expressed comfort level with CSTD use. The unit manager reported sustained gains in CSTD par level use over 2 months. The policy was revised. Many studies demonstrate that contact with hazardous agents can cause numerous problems for healthcare personnel. Staff must be educated intensively on potential risks of cytotoxic exposure and encouraged to use CSTDs to prevent aerosolization. An EBN project sustained over several months with multiple educational efforts and measures of before/after surveys of recipient beliefs and actions is one way to foster staff adherence to recommended guidelines.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:34Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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