Cultural Influences on The Use of Internet Cancer Support Groups: Asian Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164990
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Influences on The Use of Internet Cancer Support Groups: Asian Americans
Author(s):
Im, Eun-Ok; Lee, Bok Im; Li, Chia-Chun; Lee, Young Ran; Chee, Wonshik
Author Details:
Eun-Ok Im, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN, Professor, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA, email: eim@mail.nur.utexas.edu; Bok Im Lee, PhD, MPH; Chia-Chun Li, MSN, RN; Young Ran Lee, PhD; Wonshik Chee, PhD
Abstract:
Research Study: Culture has been reported to be a significant predictor of cancer experience of Asian American cancer patients. As a reason for the low usage rate of Internet cancer support groups among Asian Americans, their unique cultural values, beliefs, and attitudes related to Internet cancer support groups have been pointed out. However, very little is still known about them. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore cultural influences on the use of Internet cancer support groups among Asian Americans through a 1-month online forum. The theoretical basis was the Factors Influencing the Use of Internet Cancer Support Groups (F-ICSG) model that includes cultural factors as a major concept influencing the use of Internet cancer support groups. The study is an 1-month qualitative online forum among Asian American cancer patients. Twenty Asian American cancer patients have been recruited through the Internet cancer support groups and Internet communities/groups/organizations for Asian Americans using a convenience sampling method. Nine topics on the influences of cultural factors on the use of ICSGs are being used (the data collection is still going on). The data have been analyzed using thematic analysis. The preliminary findings indicated that Asian Americans preferred Internet cancer support groups to traditional face-to-face cancer support groups because of their cultural stigma attached to cancer. The participants preferred ethnic-specific Internet cancer support groups because they believed that only those from their ethnic groups could heartily understand their cancer experience. The participants were also concerned about security of the Internet cancer support groups (e.g., using their email addresses for commercial purposes, etc). The major barrier was their busy daily lives in immigration transition; mostly, they did not have time to use Internet cancer support groups. Also, those who are not savvy in using computers and the Internet did not want to disturb their family members' busy lives in order to use Internet cancer support groups. The findings suggest that Internet cancer support groups for Asian American cancer patients need to incorporate the influencing cultural factors in their design and need to be ethnic-specific.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Influences on The Use of Internet Cancer Support Groups: Asian Americansen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIm, Eun-Oken_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Bok Imen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Chia-Chunen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Young Ranen_US
dc.contributor.authorChee, Wonshiken_US
dc.author.detailsEun-Ok Im, PhD, MPH, RN, FAAN, Professor, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA, email: eim@mail.nur.utexas.edu; Bok Im Lee, PhD, MPH; Chia-Chun Li, MSN, RN; Young Ran Lee, PhD; Wonshik Chee, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164990-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Culture has been reported to be a significant predictor of cancer experience of Asian American cancer patients. As a reason for the low usage rate of Internet cancer support groups among Asian Americans, their unique cultural values, beliefs, and attitudes related to Internet cancer support groups have been pointed out. However, very little is still known about them. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore cultural influences on the use of Internet cancer support groups among Asian Americans through a 1-month online forum. The theoretical basis was the Factors Influencing the Use of Internet Cancer Support Groups (F-ICSG) model that includes cultural factors as a major concept influencing the use of Internet cancer support groups. The study is an 1-month qualitative online forum among Asian American cancer patients. Twenty Asian American cancer patients have been recruited through the Internet cancer support groups and Internet communities/groups/organizations for Asian Americans using a convenience sampling method. Nine topics on the influences of cultural factors on the use of ICSGs are being used (the data collection is still going on). The data have been analyzed using thematic analysis. The preliminary findings indicated that Asian Americans preferred Internet cancer support groups to traditional face-to-face cancer support groups because of their cultural stigma attached to cancer. The participants preferred ethnic-specific Internet cancer support groups because they believed that only those from their ethnic groups could heartily understand their cancer experience. The participants were also concerned about security of the Internet cancer support groups (e.g., using their email addresses for commercial purposes, etc). The major barrier was their busy daily lives in immigration transition; mostly, they did not have time to use Internet cancer support groups. Also, those who are not savvy in using computers and the Internet did not want to disturb their family members' busy lives in order to use Internet cancer support groups. The findings suggest that Internet cancer support groups for Asian American cancer patients need to incorporate the influencing cultural factors in their design and need to be ethnic-specific.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:35Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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