2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164995
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychosocial Correlates of Dyspnea Dimensions in Lung Cancer
Author(s):
Joyce, Margaret; Beck, Susan; Doig, Alexa; Meek, Paula; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Pett, Marjorie
Author Details:
Margaret Joyce, PhD(c), RN, AOCN, Interim Chief Nursing Officer, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, email: joycepe@umdnj.edu; Susan Beck, PhD, APRN, FAAN; Alexa Doig, PhD, RN; Paula Meek, PhD, RN, FAAN; Linda Patrick-Miller, PhD; Marjorie Pett, MStat, DSW
Abstract:
Research Study: Dyspnea can be a refractory symptom in lung cancer. The subjective dyspnea experience is composed of both sensory and affective dimensions. Few studies have reported correlates of lung-cancer-related dyspnea; none have examined correlates of the separate dyspnea dimensions. This study examined to what extent age, gender, race, time since diagnosis, cancer therapy, co-morbid diagnoses, smoking status, dyspnea duration, and state or trait anxiety are associated with Breathing Effort and Breathing Distress. This study addressed ONS research priorities of palliative care and evidence based practice. Evidence exists that individuals can discriminate between dyspnea dimensions. Steele and Shaver proposed a model that includes two dimensions of dyspnea and the interaction of variables to explain dyspnea tolerance. This study tested the same variables. Participants (N=37) with advanced or locally advanced lung cancer were recruited. All completed visual analog scales for breathing dimensions and the State/Trait Anxiety Inventory. Clinical and demographic information was collected. Correlational analyses evaluated variable relationships. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine predictors of Breathing Effort and Distress. The data indicated significant associations among three variables (opioid use, state anxiety and history of asthma) and Breathing Effort and Distress measures. State anxiety and scheduled opioid use accounted for 28% of the variance in Breathing Effort (R2 = .28). State anxiety was positively associated with (greater) Breathing Effort (p = .05); while scheduled opioid use was associated with less Breathing Effort (p = .01). This finding supports ONS' "Putting Evidence into Practice" dyspnea synthesis that opioids are associated with reduced cancer-related dyspnea. Self-reported history of asthma accounted for 12% of the variance of Breathing Distress score (R2 = .12). In this sample, history of asthma was positively associated with (greater) Breathing Distress. If asthma is currently inadequately managed, incorporating successful asthma therapy into the dyspnea plan of care might reduce Breathing Distress. While a small sample limited the study's generalizability, the results obtained suggested additional information to further inform understanding of the dyspnea experience in lung cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychosocial Correlates of Dyspnea Dimensions in Lung Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorJoyce, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.authorBeck, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorDoig, Alexaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeek, Paulaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatrick-Miller, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPett, Marjorieen_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Joyce, PhD(c), RN, AOCN, Interim Chief Nursing Officer, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, email: joycepe@umdnj.edu; Susan Beck, PhD, APRN, FAAN; Alexa Doig, PhD, RN; Paula Meek, PhD, RN, FAAN; Linda Patrick-Miller, PhD; Marjorie Pett, MStat, DSWen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164995-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Dyspnea can be a refractory symptom in lung cancer. The subjective dyspnea experience is composed of both sensory and affective dimensions. Few studies have reported correlates of lung-cancer-related dyspnea; none have examined correlates of the separate dyspnea dimensions. This study examined to what extent age, gender, race, time since diagnosis, cancer therapy, co-morbid diagnoses, smoking status, dyspnea duration, and state or trait anxiety are associated with Breathing Effort and Breathing Distress. This study addressed ONS research priorities of palliative care and evidence based practice. Evidence exists that individuals can discriminate between dyspnea dimensions. Steele and Shaver proposed a model that includes two dimensions of dyspnea and the interaction of variables to explain dyspnea tolerance. This study tested the same variables. Participants (N=37) with advanced or locally advanced lung cancer were recruited. All completed visual analog scales for breathing dimensions and the State/Trait Anxiety Inventory. Clinical and demographic information was collected. Correlational analyses evaluated variable relationships. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine predictors of Breathing Effort and Distress. The data indicated significant associations among three variables (opioid use, state anxiety and history of asthma) and Breathing Effort and Distress measures. State anxiety and scheduled opioid use accounted for 28% of the variance in Breathing Effort (R2 = .28). State anxiety was positively associated with (greater) Breathing Effort (p = .05); while scheduled opioid use was associated with less Breathing Effort (p = .01). This finding supports ONS' "Putting Evidence into Practice" dyspnea synthesis that opioids are associated with reduced cancer-related dyspnea. Self-reported history of asthma accounted for 12% of the variance of Breathing Distress score (R2 = .12). In this sample, history of asthma was positively associated with (greater) Breathing Distress. If asthma is currently inadequately managed, incorporating successful asthma therapy into the dyspnea plan of care might reduce Breathing Distress. While a small sample limited the study's generalizability, the results obtained suggested additional information to further inform understanding of the dyspnea experience in lung cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:41Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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