IMPROVING OUTCOMES OF A NURSING ORIENTATION PROGRAM ON A HEMATOLOGY ONCOLOGY TRANSPLANT UNIT USING AN EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE MODEL TO INCREASE PRECEPTOR SUPPORT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164999
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IMPROVING OUTCOMES OF A NURSING ORIENTATION PROGRAM ON A HEMATOLOGY ONCOLOGY TRANSPLANT UNIT USING AN EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE MODEL TO INCREASE PRECEPTOR SUPPORT
Author(s):
Kauflin, Kristine; Castro, Kathleen; Babb, Rebecca; Carpenter, Ashley
Author Details:
Kristine Kauflin, RN, BSN ,OCN, Senior Clinical Research Nurse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, email: kauflink@cc.nih.gov; Kathleen Castro, RN, MSN, AOCN; Rebecca Babb, RN, CPON, OCN; Ashley Carpenter, RN, BSN, OCN
Abstract:
Education: Increasing patient acuity and complexity along with the current nursing shortage have led to difficulty recruiting and retaining oncology nurses. Due to the complex treatment and symptom management regimens used in oncology, nursing orientation programs play a critical role in training and retaining oncology nursing professionals. The key element of a successful orientation program is a willing preceptor with oncology nursing expertise. The effort to educate new nurses, however, is complicated when experienced oncology nurses are not qualified as preceptors or lack interest in the process. Our purpose is to describe how an evidence based practice model was used to improve preceptor support and increase the number of preceptors on a hematology oncology transplant unit. A literature search was performed of nursing and medical databases (example: PubMed, Cinahl). The current literature focused on the importance of the preceptor role in the successful integration of the new employee and observed that precepting is time consuming, stressful and lacking rewards. Little attention has been given to strategies that increase the number of preceptors. Our team held four journal clubs with oncology preceptors to develop an understanding of their perceptions of the role. Feedback showed that preceptors valued the responsibility but felt they were given heavier assignments and had little time to teach or complete paperwork. They also sensed that unit leadership was disconnected from the orientation process. To improve preceptor support, we modified our program by implementing and including unit leadership at bimonthly meetings in which the preceptor and new nurse identified goals and barriers. Preceptors also completed a tool to evaluate orientation progress. Successful outcomes that were noted as a result of more consistent preceptor support included an increase in the number of qualified preceptors, quicker identification of problem areas, and a 70% improvement in completion of the competency process utilized by the unit to validate nursing skills. Recruiting and retaining nurses in the oncology nursing profession is essential to improve patient outcomes and reduce training costs. Developing a structured preceptor support program is a manageable way to improve the quality of oncology nursing care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIMPROVING OUTCOMES OF A NURSING ORIENTATION PROGRAM ON A HEMATOLOGY ONCOLOGY TRANSPLANT UNIT USING AN EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE MODEL TO INCREASE PRECEPTOR SUPPORTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKauflin, Kristineen_US
dc.contributor.authorCastro, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorBabb, Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Ashleyen_US
dc.author.detailsKristine Kauflin, RN, BSN ,OCN, Senior Clinical Research Nurse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA, email: kauflink@cc.nih.gov; Kathleen Castro, RN, MSN, AOCN; Rebecca Babb, RN, CPON, OCN; Ashley Carpenter, RN, BSN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164999-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Increasing patient acuity and complexity along with the current nursing shortage have led to difficulty recruiting and retaining oncology nurses. Due to the complex treatment and symptom management regimens used in oncology, nursing orientation programs play a critical role in training and retaining oncology nursing professionals. The key element of a successful orientation program is a willing preceptor with oncology nursing expertise. The effort to educate new nurses, however, is complicated when experienced oncology nurses are not qualified as preceptors or lack interest in the process. Our purpose is to describe how an evidence based practice model was used to improve preceptor support and increase the number of preceptors on a hematology oncology transplant unit. A literature search was performed of nursing and medical databases (example: PubMed, Cinahl). The current literature focused on the importance of the preceptor role in the successful integration of the new employee and observed that precepting is time consuming, stressful and lacking rewards. Little attention has been given to strategies that increase the number of preceptors. Our team held four journal clubs with oncology preceptors to develop an understanding of their perceptions of the role. Feedback showed that preceptors valued the responsibility but felt they were given heavier assignments and had little time to teach or complete paperwork. They also sensed that unit leadership was disconnected from the orientation process. To improve preceptor support, we modified our program by implementing and including unit leadership at bimonthly meetings in which the preceptor and new nurse identified goals and barriers. Preceptors also completed a tool to evaluate orientation progress. Successful outcomes that were noted as a result of more consistent preceptor support included an increase in the number of qualified preceptors, quicker identification of problem areas, and a 70% improvement in completion of the competency process utilized by the unit to validate nursing skills. Recruiting and retaining nurses in the oncology nursing profession is essential to improve patient outcomes and reduce training costs. Developing a structured preceptor support program is a manageable way to improve the quality of oncology nursing care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:45Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.