2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165004
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Empowering Nursing Practice Through Clinical Practice Guidelines
Author(s):
Kratz, Melissa; Shearburn, Patricia
Author Details:
Melissa Kratz, RN, MSN, AOCN, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA, email: melissa.kratz@lvh.com; Patricia Shearburn, RN, MSN, AOCN
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: In 2004 we identified 600 nurse to physician calls for patient symptom management. In all cases the nurses requested specific orders. This led to the implementation of nurse managed clinical practice guidelines (CPG) on our inpatient oncology units. The specific guidelines included: nausea/vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, and blood transfusion. The guidelines included specific assessments to be done with algorithms guiding the management of symptoms. The nurses were empowered to implement the CPGÆs without prior call to physician therefore expediting care and relief of symptoms. Based on increased physician and nurse satisfaction the decision was made to develop and implement CPGs in our outpatient infusion units. The goal was to replicate the success of the CPGs in the outpatient arena leading to more efficient patient care as well as increased nurse and physician satisfaction. A Quality Circle committee was formed and includes staff RN's from infusion, radiation oncology and physician offices as well as pharmacists and CNS. The committee identified potential evidenced based CPGs that would decrease time on the phone waiting for physician orders. ONS PEP cards were utilized to develop the CPGs. The following CPGs have been developed and implemented in the outpatient arena: Nausea/vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, dehydration/hypovolemia, Electrolyte Imbalance, and Management of CVCs without blood return. In addition several medication specific guidelines have been developed. A standardized approval process is in place to assure all CPGs are approved by physicians, nurses and pharmacists prior to use in patient care. The CNS were responsible to educate the nurses and provide clinical support for the implementation of CPGs. Initially the nursing staff was uncomfortable with the idea of CPGs, however encouraging them to be part of the development and approval process proved to ease the transition. In addition, extensive education and support by the CNS in the clinical environment helped to minimize the anxiety. We are currently evaluating nursing and physician satisfaction. Insight gleaned from the staff is invaluable in the development of CPGs. CPGs have increased the quality and efficiency of care in our infusion centers by assuring our care is evidenced based and minimizing wait time for the patient.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmpowering Nursing Practice Through Clinical Practice Guidelinesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKratz, Melissaen_US
dc.contributor.authorShearburn, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsMelissa Kratz, RN, MSN, AOCN, Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist, Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania, USA, email: melissa.kratz@lvh.com; Patricia Shearburn, RN, MSN, AOCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165004-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: In 2004 we identified 600 nurse to physician calls for patient symptom management. In all cases the nurses requested specific orders. This led to the implementation of nurse managed clinical practice guidelines (CPG) on our inpatient oncology units. The specific guidelines included: nausea/vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, and blood transfusion. The guidelines included specific assessments to be done with algorithms guiding the management of symptoms. The nurses were empowered to implement the CPGÆs without prior call to physician therefore expediting care and relief of symptoms. Based on increased physician and nurse satisfaction the decision was made to develop and implement CPGs in our outpatient infusion units. The goal was to replicate the success of the CPGs in the outpatient arena leading to more efficient patient care as well as increased nurse and physician satisfaction. A Quality Circle committee was formed and includes staff RN's from infusion, radiation oncology and physician offices as well as pharmacists and CNS. The committee identified potential evidenced based CPGs that would decrease time on the phone waiting for physician orders. ONS PEP cards were utilized to develop the CPGs. The following CPGs have been developed and implemented in the outpatient arena: Nausea/vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, dehydration/hypovolemia, Electrolyte Imbalance, and Management of CVCs without blood return. In addition several medication specific guidelines have been developed. A standardized approval process is in place to assure all CPGs are approved by physicians, nurses and pharmacists prior to use in patient care. The CNS were responsible to educate the nurses and provide clinical support for the implementation of CPGs. Initially the nursing staff was uncomfortable with the idea of CPGs, however encouraging them to be part of the development and approval process proved to ease the transition. In addition, extensive education and support by the CNS in the clinical environment helped to minimize the anxiety. We are currently evaluating nursing and physician satisfaction. Insight gleaned from the staff is invaluable in the development of CPGs. CPGs have increased the quality and efficiency of care in our infusion centers by assuring our care is evidenced based and minimizing wait time for the patient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:50Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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