EFFECTS OF AN EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON BREAST CANCER SCREENING AND EARLY DETECTION IN VIETNAMESE AMERICAN WOMEN

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165009
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EFFECTS OF AN EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON BREAST CANCER SCREENING AND EARLY DETECTION IN VIETNAMESE AMERICAN WOMEN
Author(s):
Ho, Tuong-Vi
Author Details:
Tuong-Vi Ho, RN Ph.D, Nurse Practitioner, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: tho@mdanderson.org
Abstract:
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Vietnamese women, and they are often diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age. About 50% of the women are younger than 50 years of age at time of diagnosis with advanced stages, which makes optimal treatment difficult. Education of the importance of early screening and detection could possibly improve and save lives in this population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a culturally sensitive educational intervention on breast cancer knowledge, breast cancer health beliefs, breast-self-exam (BSE) knowledge, BSE practices and its confidence levels, mammogram activities, and clinical breast exam in a group of Vietnamese American women living in the Houston vicinity. The Health Belief Model (HBM) and components of LeiningerÆs transcultural nursing theory were used as the theoretical framework. Methods and Analysis: This was an experimental two-group pre- test/post-test study. Using chi-square and one-way ANOVA statistical analysis, demographic data and the effects of the intervention were evaluated in a sample of 94 Vietnamese American women who were randomized to control and experimental groups. Data was obtained at before and 3 months after the educational intervention Two components of the HBM (perceived seriousness, p < 0.01, and perceived benefit p < 0.01) were found to be significantly different between the 2 groups. There were significant increases in the level of BSE knowledge (p = 0.005), level of confidence in performing BSE (p = 0.009), a higher self-report of BSE practice (p = 0.007), and an increase in breast cancer knowledge within the intervention group (p = 0.000). No significant changes were found in self-reported mammogram activities and clinical breast exam. However, about 80% of the participants reported that they had made appointments for mammograms. These findings indicate that a culturally sensitive educational intervention given by an oncology nurse had a positive impact on the health beliefs and practices related to breast cancer screening and early detection in this population. This intervention can be used as a model for other ethnic- specific oncology educational programs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEFFECTS OF AN EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION ON BREAST CANCER SCREENING AND EARLY DETECTION IN VIETNAMESE AMERICAN WOMENen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHo, Tuong-Vien_US
dc.author.detailsTuong-Vi Ho, RN Ph.D, Nurse Practitioner, M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: tho@mdanderson.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165009-
dc.description.abstractBreast cancer is the most common cancer in Vietnamese women, and they are often diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age. About 50% of the women are younger than 50 years of age at time of diagnosis with advanced stages, which makes optimal treatment difficult. Education of the importance of early screening and detection could possibly improve and save lives in this population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a culturally sensitive educational intervention on breast cancer knowledge, breast cancer health beliefs, breast-self-exam (BSE) knowledge, BSE practices and its confidence levels, mammogram activities, and clinical breast exam in a group of Vietnamese American women living in the Houston vicinity. The Health Belief Model (HBM) and components of Leininger&AElig;s transcultural nursing theory were used as the theoretical framework. Methods and Analysis: This was an experimental two-group pre- test/post-test study. Using chi-square and one-way ANOVA statistical analysis, demographic data and the effects of the intervention were evaluated in a sample of 94 Vietnamese American women who were randomized to control and experimental groups. Data was obtained at before and 3 months after the educational intervention Two components of the HBM (perceived seriousness, p &lt; 0.01, and perceived benefit p &lt; 0.01) were found to be significantly different between the 2 groups. There were significant increases in the level of BSE knowledge (p = 0.005), level of confidence in performing BSE (p = 0.009), a higher self-report of BSE practice (p = 0.007), and an increase in breast cancer knowledge within the intervention group (p = 0.000). No significant changes were found in self-reported mammogram activities and clinical breast exam. However, about 80% of the participants reported that they had made appointments for mammograms. These findings indicate that a culturally sensitive educational intervention given by an oncology nurse had a positive impact on the health beliefs and practices related to breast cancer screening and early detection in this population. This intervention can be used as a model for other ethnic- specific oncology educational programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:55Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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