2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165011
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE: IS IT WORTH THE EXTRA TWO DOLLARS?
Author(s):
Huang, Cheryl; Catania, Kimberly
Author Details:
Cheryl Huang, RN MS AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, The Ohio State University Medical Center - James Cancer Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA, email: cheryl.huang@osumc.edu; Kimberly Catania, RN, MSN
Abstract:
Multiple blood products are transfused on a daily basis in inpatient and outpatient areas of the hospital. Nurses expressed concern with incomplete or difficult transfusions by gravity administration which resulted in increased nursing time and expense as well as decreased anecdotal patient satisfaction with long stays in the outpatient areas to complete transfusions. The goal of nursing staff was to change practice to decrease or eliminate these problems by changing the administration of blood products from gravity drip to transfusion by infusion pump. A literature review indicated very little current research with most studies completed in the 1980's. Results of the studies found no clinically significant effects on blood cells when transfused by infusion pump. The advantages of infusion pump transfusions cited in the literature were controlled flow and decreased product waste. The current vendor for the infusion pumps utilized in the institution provided research results that supported the use of the pumps. New tubing was the only equipment requirement to implementing the change. Benchmarking with similar institutions revealed both methods of transfusion were utilized. Approval for practice change was sought and received from three major practice committees. Once new tubing was obtained the change could be implemented; however, the tubing cost two dollars more than current tubing used, translating to a large increase in cost for the health system. Approval for such an increase was required from another committee, but was not granted as the evidence provided did not support the cost increase. The focus of the study needed to change to why pumps should be used. New data was collected over the ensuing three months which examined costs related to missed or incomplete transfusions and nursing time invested in difficult transfusions. The cost, over $60,000 supported the change which resulted in anecdotal increases in patient and staff satisfaction and no further indication of incomplete or wasted transfusions. All impacts of practice change need to be evaluated in the process of gaining evidence so that glitches to implementing change do not occur.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE: IS IT WORTH THE EXTRA TWO DOLLARS?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Cherylen_US
dc.contributor.authorCatania, Kimberlyen_US
dc.author.detailsCheryl Huang, RN MS AOCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, The Ohio State University Medical Center - James Cancer Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA, email: cheryl.huang@osumc.edu; Kimberly Catania, RN, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165011-
dc.description.abstractMultiple blood products are transfused on a daily basis in inpatient and outpatient areas of the hospital. Nurses expressed concern with incomplete or difficult transfusions by gravity administration which resulted in increased nursing time and expense as well as decreased anecdotal patient satisfaction with long stays in the outpatient areas to complete transfusions. The goal of nursing staff was to change practice to decrease or eliminate these problems by changing the administration of blood products from gravity drip to transfusion by infusion pump. A literature review indicated very little current research with most studies completed in the 1980's. Results of the studies found no clinically significant effects on blood cells when transfused by infusion pump. The advantages of infusion pump transfusions cited in the literature were controlled flow and decreased product waste. The current vendor for the infusion pumps utilized in the institution provided research results that supported the use of the pumps. New tubing was the only equipment requirement to implementing the change. Benchmarking with similar institutions revealed both methods of transfusion were utilized. Approval for practice change was sought and received from three major practice committees. Once new tubing was obtained the change could be implemented; however, the tubing cost two dollars more than current tubing used, translating to a large increase in cost for the health system. Approval for such an increase was required from another committee, but was not granted as the evidence provided did not support the cost increase. The focus of the study needed to change to why pumps should be used. New data was collected over the ensuing three months which examined costs related to missed or incomplete transfusions and nursing time invested in difficult transfusions. The cost, over $60,000 supported the change which resulted in anecdotal increases in patient and staff satisfaction and no further indication of incomplete or wasted transfusions. All impacts of practice change need to be evaluated in the process of gaining evidence so that glitches to implementing change do not occur.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:57Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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