ADAPTATION THEORY AND SYMPTOMS OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER IN CANCER PAIN PATIENTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165012
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ADAPTATION THEORY AND SYMPTOMS OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER IN CANCER PAIN PATIENTS
Author(s):
Huebert, Linda; Schwabish, Stephen; Zevon, Michael; Casasola, Oscar de Leon
Author Details:
Linda Huebert, RN BSN OCN, Ambulatory Nurse Manager, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: linda.huebert@roswellpark.org; Stephen Schwabish, PhD, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, California; Michael Zevon, PhD; Oscar de Leon-Casasola, MD
Abstract:
Previous studies examining oncology patients experiencing pain have reported an increase in post-traumatic stress disorder; however the methodology and level of reported post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been variable. The extent to which PTSD exists in the cancer pain population also remains unclear. In addition, the potential moderating impact of cognitive adaptation beliefs on the severity of PTSD warrants exploration. To empirically explore relationships between components of cognitive adaptation theory and the development of PTSD in patients receiving treatment for cancer-related pain. Cognitive adaptation theory has been shown in prior research to be related to stress management in a range of patient populations. The hypothesis is that PTSD symptoms will be minimized in pain patients who employ the optimism, mastery, and self-esteem cognitive adaptation responses. Conversely, less use of these cognitive responses is hypothesized to be related to higher levels of PTSD severity. An empirical evaluation of the relationship of cognitive adaptation theory components - optimism, mastery, and self-esteem cognitions - to PTSD symptoms in cancer pain patients was conducted. A self report questionnaire based methodology was used. Correlational analyses will examine the strength and direction of the relationships between optimism, mastery and self-esteem and PTSD severity. The pilot sample examined herein consists of 25 patients (18+ years) currently receiving treatment in the Pain Clinic. Patients were evaluated with well validated construct measures. Measures of cognitive adaptation theory include Life Orientation Test, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Mastery Scale. This study will use the PTSD Checklist - Civilian, a widely used, well developed measure of post-traumatic stress. Descriptive statistics will be computed for the dependent variables and subject demographics. Support for the hypothesized impact of cognitive adaptation beliefs will provide valuable information relevant to the development of interventions with this critical population. These interventions can be integrated into ongoing nursing care for this challenging population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleADAPTATION THEORY AND SYMPTOMS OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER IN CANCER PAIN PATIENTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHuebert, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchwabish, Stephenen_US
dc.contributor.authorZevon, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorCasasola, Oscar de Leonen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Huebert, RN BSN OCN, Ambulatory Nurse Manager, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: linda.huebert@roswellpark.org; Stephen Schwabish, PhD, Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara, California; Michael Zevon, PhD; Oscar de Leon-Casasola, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165012-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies examining oncology patients experiencing pain have reported an increase in post-traumatic stress disorder; however the methodology and level of reported post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been variable. The extent to which PTSD exists in the cancer pain population also remains unclear. In addition, the potential moderating impact of cognitive adaptation beliefs on the severity of PTSD warrants exploration. To empirically explore relationships between components of cognitive adaptation theory and the development of PTSD in patients receiving treatment for cancer-related pain. Cognitive adaptation theory has been shown in prior research to be related to stress management in a range of patient populations. The hypothesis is that PTSD symptoms will be minimized in pain patients who employ the optimism, mastery, and self-esteem cognitive adaptation responses. Conversely, less use of these cognitive responses is hypothesized to be related to higher levels of PTSD severity. An empirical evaluation of the relationship of cognitive adaptation theory components - optimism, mastery, and self-esteem cognitions - to PTSD symptoms in cancer pain patients was conducted. A self report questionnaire based methodology was used. Correlational analyses will examine the strength and direction of the relationships between optimism, mastery and self-esteem and PTSD severity. The pilot sample examined herein consists of 25 patients (18+ years) currently receiving treatment in the Pain Clinic. Patients were evaluated with well validated construct measures. Measures of cognitive adaptation theory include Life Orientation Test, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Mastery Scale. This study will use the PTSD Checklist - Civilian, a widely used, well developed measure of post-traumatic stress. Descriptive statistics will be computed for the dependent variables and subject demographics. Support for the hypothesized impact of cognitive adaptation beliefs will provide valuable information relevant to the development of interventions with this critical population. These interventions can be integrated into ongoing nursing care for this challenging population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:58Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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