2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165013
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
MEANING AND EXPERIENCES OF DIGNITY TO URBAN POOR WITH ADVANCED CANCER
Author(s):
Hughes, Anne; Gudmundsdottir, Maria; Davies, Betty
Author Details:
Anne Hughes, RN MN AOCN, FAAN, Advanced Practice Nurse, Palliative Care, Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center/SFDPH, San Francisco, California, USA, email: ahughes194@sbcglobal.net; Maria Gudmundsdottir, RN, PhD; Betty Davies, RN, PhD, FAAN; University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Abstract:
Vulnerable populations, such as the urban poor, are disproportionately affected by cancer. Poor persons face barriers accessing quality cancer care and when receiving care, may experience insensitivity to their plight. Dignity is a ubiquitous concept in bioethics and theology, and is often mentioned in the context of providing care to older adults, the disabled, and to those who are dying. The everyday experiences of the urban poor living with advanced cancer are largely invisible in the literature and the psychosocial and existential consequences of their illness and treatment rarely described. The purpose of this study is to understand the meaning of dignity to the urban poor and to describe their experiences living with advanced cancer. Interpretive phenomenology is the qualitative approach used to uncover the meanings of dignity and to describe the experiences of the urban poor with advanced cancer through their own stories. Patients were recruited from providers caring for the urban poor. Data were collected from in-depth interviews which were audiotaped and transcribed. Patients were interviewed 1-3 times. Interview transcripts and field notes are the data sources for this analysis, which is part of larger project. Researchers identified and analyzed themes both within and across cases. Fourteen patients with stage III or IV solid tumors (lung, breast, colorectal, etc.) participated in the study. The sample of 6 men and 8 women, ranged in age from 38-69 years, half of the sample (50%) were persons of color (5 African Americans and 2 Hispanic/Latinos). A central finding for this urban sample coping with serious illness was that most persons, even those only weeks from death, focused on living not on dying. Moreover, participantsÆ descriptions of their experiences focused not on dignity but rather on indignity. Their indignity stories, such as being talked down to or not listened to and the embarrassment of fecal or urinary incontinence, were described in vivid detail. This research confirms the importance of person centered communication that recognizes the humanity of the patient regardless of their psychosocial circumstances and the need to expediently meet hygiene and toileting needs to decrease threats to their dignity.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMEANING AND EXPERIENCES OF DIGNITY TO URBAN POOR WITH ADVANCED CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorGudmundsdottir, Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Bettyen_US
dc.author.detailsAnne Hughes, RN MN AOCN, FAAN, Advanced Practice Nurse, Palliative Care, Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center/SFDPH, San Francisco, California, USA, email: ahughes194@sbcglobal.net; Maria Gudmundsdottir, RN, PhD; Betty Davies, RN, PhD, FAAN; University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, Californiaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165013-
dc.description.abstractVulnerable populations, such as the urban poor, are disproportionately affected by cancer. Poor persons face barriers accessing quality cancer care and when receiving care, may experience insensitivity to their plight. Dignity is a ubiquitous concept in bioethics and theology, and is often mentioned in the context of providing care to older adults, the disabled, and to those who are dying. The everyday experiences of the urban poor living with advanced cancer are largely invisible in the literature and the psychosocial and existential consequences of their illness and treatment rarely described. The purpose of this study is to understand the meaning of dignity to the urban poor and to describe their experiences living with advanced cancer. Interpretive phenomenology is the qualitative approach used to uncover the meanings of dignity and to describe the experiences of the urban poor with advanced cancer through their own stories. Patients were recruited from providers caring for the urban poor. Data were collected from in-depth interviews which were audiotaped and transcribed. Patients were interviewed 1-3 times. Interview transcripts and field notes are the data sources for this analysis, which is part of larger project. Researchers identified and analyzed themes both within and across cases. Fourteen patients with stage III or IV solid tumors (lung, breast, colorectal, etc.) participated in the study. The sample of 6 men and 8 women, ranged in age from 38-69 years, half of the sample (50%) were persons of color (5 African Americans and 2 Hispanic/Latinos). A central finding for this urban sample coping with serious illness was that most persons, even those only weeks from death, focused on living not on dying. Moreover, participantsÆ descriptions of their experiences focused not on dignity but rather on indignity. Their indignity stories, such as being talked down to or not listened to and the embarrassment of fecal or urinary incontinence, were described in vivid detail. This research confirms the importance of person centered communication that recognizes the humanity of the patient regardless of their psychosocial circumstances and the need to expediently meet hygiene and toileting needs to decrease threats to their dignity.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:10:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:10:59Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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