A PILOT STUDY OF DECISION MAKING PREFERENCES IN PERSONS WITH ADVANCED CANCER

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165014
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A PILOT STUDY OF DECISION MAKING PREFERENCES IN PERSONS WITH ADVANCED CANCER
Author(s):
Hughes, Anne
Author Details:
Anne Hughes, RN MN AOCN, Advanced Practice Nurse, Palliative Care, Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center/SFDPH, San Francisco, California, USA, email: ahughes194@sbcglobal.net
Abstract:
While recent literature suggests that patientsÆ abilities to participate freely in medical decisions when chronically or seriously ill, may not be completely autonomous given the gravity of what is at stake and the patientsÆ knowledge base, nevertheless in the US, patient participation is a key aspect of cancer care, and is a cornerstone of western bioethics culture. The ability of socio-economically disadvantaged persons living with advanced cancer to participate in medical decision making is not well described in the literature. The purpose of this pilot study is to describe the decision making preferences of persons with advanced cancer who are poor and living in an urban area. The theoretical framework for this pilot is patient decision making theory who maintains that there are a range of preferences patientsÆ may demonstrate when faced with a medical decision. This analysis is part of a larger study, using mixed methods to explore the meaning of dignity. Patients were recruited from providers caring for the urban poor. The Control Preference Scale was administered to the participants by the researcher along with other study instruments. Data analysis included computing the patientÆs decision making preference based on the paired sort of five decision making styles, and by asking for the one decision making style which best reflects the patientÆs usual style of decision making. Sixteen patients with advanced cancer participated in this pilot, most had stage III or stage IV solid tumors (lung, breast, colorectal, etc.). Three of the 16 patients also had AIDS. The sample included 7 men and 9 women, ranged in age from 38-69 years, and half of the sample were persons of color (6 African Americans and 2 Hispanic/ Latinos). Patients displayed a range of decision making preferences most wanting shared decision making with their physician. As several patients commented during the administration of this survey, ôIÆm not a doctor.ö This pilot reinforces the need to assess patientsÆ decision making preference, regardless of economic resources when coping with cancer, and leaves unanswered how decision making preference may change over time as the illness progresses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA PILOT STUDY OF DECISION MAKING PREFERENCES IN PERSONS WITH ADVANCED CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Anneen_US
dc.author.detailsAnne Hughes, RN MN AOCN, Advanced Practice Nurse, Palliative Care, Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center/SFDPH, San Francisco, California, USA, email: ahughes194@sbcglobal.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165014-
dc.description.abstractWhile recent literature suggests that patientsÆ abilities to participate freely in medical decisions when chronically or seriously ill, may not be completely autonomous given the gravity of what is at stake and the patientsÆ knowledge base, nevertheless in the US, patient participation is a key aspect of cancer care, and is a cornerstone of western bioethics culture. The ability of socio-economically disadvantaged persons living with advanced cancer to participate in medical decision making is not well described in the literature. The purpose of this pilot study is to describe the decision making preferences of persons with advanced cancer who are poor and living in an urban area. The theoretical framework for this pilot is patient decision making theory who maintains that there are a range of preferences patientsÆ may demonstrate when faced with a medical decision. This analysis is part of a larger study, using mixed methods to explore the meaning of dignity. Patients were recruited from providers caring for the urban poor. The Control Preference Scale was administered to the participants by the researcher along with other study instruments. Data analysis included computing the patientÆs decision making preference based on the paired sort of five decision making styles, and by asking for the one decision making style which best reflects the patientÆs usual style of decision making. Sixteen patients with advanced cancer participated in this pilot, most had stage III or stage IV solid tumors (lung, breast, colorectal, etc.). Three of the 16 patients also had AIDS. The sample included 7 men and 9 women, ranged in age from 38-69 years, and half of the sample were persons of color (6 African Americans and 2 Hispanic/ Latinos). Patients displayed a range of decision making preferences most wanting shared decision making with their physician. As several patients commented during the administration of this survey, ôIÆm not a doctor.ö This pilot reinforces the need to assess patientsÆ decision making preference, regardless of economic resources when coping with cancer, and leaves unanswered how decision making preference may change over time as the illness progresses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:00Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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