2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165020
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ONCOLOGY NURSES' PERCEPTIONS OF COMMON PATIENT PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED IN CARE
Author(s):
Johnson, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Johnson, RN MSN AOCN AOCNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: ejohnson@partners.org
Abstract:
Nursing care involves the management of clinical problems related to disease or treatment. Nursing care is often multidimensional requiring ongoing critical analysis of competency and staffing needs. Oncology nursing can be especially complex given the multiple organ involvement related to the malignancy, disease progression, and treatments as well as the overlay of psycho-social considerations. To describe the perceptions of oncology nurses in an academic medical center regarding common patient problems encountered in daily clinical practice and their preparedness to manage them. Brenda Lyon's Disease/Illness Paradigm A secondary analysis of data obtained from nurses in an academic medical center who were surveyed about how frequently they encountered each of 27 clinical problems in their daily practice along with their self-perceived preparedness to manage each problem. The list of problems was generated by a diverse group of clinical nurse specialists. Subsets of data for inpatient and infusion oncology nurses were compared with each other and with the responses of all nurses in the institution. Among the top five problems most frequently encountered, anxiety and knowledge deficit were identified by all three groups. The infusion nurses and inpatient oncology nurses had scores near 90 percent on preparedness to manage anxiety as compared with a score of 83 for all nurses. Preparedness to manage knowledge deficit scores were similar at 85 percent in all groups. Infection was among the top five problems for all nurses and the inpatient oncology nurses, with preparedness scores near 90 percent, but infection was not among the top five problems encountered by the infusion nurses, perhaps reflecting a basic difference between inpatient and outpatient populations. On the other hand, ethical dilemmas related to end-of-life care was the most frequently perceived problem by the infusion nurses but was ranked 11.5/27 by the inpatient oncology nurses and 18/27 by all respondents, perhaps reflecting that infusion nurses often see patients closer to the time of their cancer diagnosis. The findings provide data to guide the clinical nurse specialist in planning quality improvement surveys and developing interventions to meet the knowledge needs of oncology staff nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleONCOLOGY NURSES' PERCEPTIONS OF COMMON PATIENT PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED IN CAREen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Johnson, RN MSN AOCN AOCNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: ejohnson@partners.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165020-
dc.description.abstractNursing care involves the management of clinical problems related to disease or treatment. Nursing care is often multidimensional requiring ongoing critical analysis of competency and staffing needs. Oncology nursing can be especially complex given the multiple organ involvement related to the malignancy, disease progression, and treatments as well as the overlay of psycho-social considerations. To describe the perceptions of oncology nurses in an academic medical center regarding common patient problems encountered in daily clinical practice and their preparedness to manage them. Brenda Lyon's Disease/Illness Paradigm A secondary analysis of data obtained from nurses in an academic medical center who were surveyed about how frequently they encountered each of 27 clinical problems in their daily practice along with their self-perceived preparedness to manage each problem. The list of problems was generated by a diverse group of clinical nurse specialists. Subsets of data for inpatient and infusion oncology nurses were compared with each other and with the responses of all nurses in the institution. Among the top five problems most frequently encountered, anxiety and knowledge deficit were identified by all three groups. The infusion nurses and inpatient oncology nurses had scores near 90 percent on preparedness to manage anxiety as compared with a score of 83 for all nurses. Preparedness to manage knowledge deficit scores were similar at 85 percent in all groups. Infection was among the top five problems for all nurses and the inpatient oncology nurses, with preparedness scores near 90 percent, but infection was not among the top five problems encountered by the infusion nurses, perhaps reflecting a basic difference between inpatient and outpatient populations. On the other hand, ethical dilemmas related to end-of-life care was the most frequently perceived problem by the infusion nurses but was ranked 11.5/27 by the inpatient oncology nurses and 18/27 by all respondents, perhaps reflecting that infusion nurses often see patients closer to the time of their cancer diagnosis. The findings provide data to guide the clinical nurse specialist in planning quality improvement surveys and developing interventions to meet the knowledge needs of oncology staff nurses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:06Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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