2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165023
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FACTORS AFFECTING PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING DECISION-MAKING AMONG BLACKS
Author(s):
Jones, Randy; Steeves, Richard; Williams, Ishan
Author Details:
Randy Jones, PHD RN, Assistant Professor, Roberts Scholar, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia,USA, email: raj9c@virginia.edu; Richard Steeves, PhD, RN, FNP, FAAN; Ishan Williams, PhD
Abstract:
Black men are 2-3 times more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than Whites. Cultural beliefs play a major role in screening behaviors. These beliefs may assist in the decision whether or not to be screened for prostate cancer. To provide culturally sensitive care, healthcare professionals must be aware of these beliefs. The purpose of this study is to understand prostate cancer screening decision-making among rural Blacks. The studyÆs goal is to conduct an in-depth analysis of beliefs on prostate cancer screening among rural Blacks. How these beliefs and attitudes may or may not have influenced their health decision-making process were explored also. This study used a qualitative design. The data that is being analyzed utilizes the hermeneutic/phenomenological approach to explore the ôlived experiencesö of the participants. The ôlived experiencesö related to the participantsÆ views on prostate cancer screening. The sample includes age 40 and older Black men who never been diagnosed with prostate cancer, but may or may not have been screened. Participant recruitment takes place at rural community centers (i.e. barbershops and churches). Semi-structured interviews explored health status, demographics, prostate cancer screening knowledge, healthcare providers and family interactions, and religious beliefs. Data collection will be terminated upon moment of data saturation. Data will be analyzed using qualitative and descriptive methods. The study is still underway. Current findings include rural Black men not being aware of the increase risks of being diagnosed with prostate cancer, and the importance of family in deciding to have a prostate screening performed. These men reported it was much later in life until they heard about prostate cancer. More findings will emerge. The results will give healthcare providers clues in how to sustain and improve care they deliver to this vulnerable population. The findings will aid in the development of a culturally-sensitive decision aid. The study has great promise to improve interactions between healthcare providers and patients and promote unity among the community and healthcare systems.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFACTORS AFFECTING PROSTATE CANCER SCREENING DECISION-MAKING AMONG BLACKSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, Randyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSteeves, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Ishanen_US
dc.author.detailsRandy Jones, PHD RN, Assistant Professor, Roberts Scholar, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia,USA, email: raj9c@virginia.edu; Richard Steeves, PhD, RN, FNP, FAAN; Ishan Williams, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165023-
dc.description.abstractBlack men are 2-3 times more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than Whites. Cultural beliefs play a major role in screening behaviors. These beliefs may assist in the decision whether or not to be screened for prostate cancer. To provide culturally sensitive care, healthcare professionals must be aware of these beliefs. The purpose of this study is to understand prostate cancer screening decision-making among rural Blacks. The studyÆs goal is to conduct an in-depth analysis of beliefs on prostate cancer screening among rural Blacks. How these beliefs and attitudes may or may not have influenced their health decision-making process were explored also. This study used a qualitative design. The data that is being analyzed utilizes the hermeneutic/phenomenological approach to explore the ôlived experiencesö of the participants. The ôlived experiencesö related to the participantsÆ views on prostate cancer screening. The sample includes age 40 and older Black men who never been diagnosed with prostate cancer, but may or may not have been screened. Participant recruitment takes place at rural community centers (i.e. barbershops and churches). Semi-structured interviews explored health status, demographics, prostate cancer screening knowledge, healthcare providers and family interactions, and religious beliefs. Data collection will be terminated upon moment of data saturation. Data will be analyzed using qualitative and descriptive methods. The study is still underway. Current findings include rural Black men not being aware of the increase risks of being diagnosed with prostate cancer, and the importance of family in deciding to have a prostate screening performed. These men reported it was much later in life until they heard about prostate cancer. More findings will emerge. The results will give healthcare providers clues in how to sustain and improve care they deliver to this vulnerable population. The findings will aid in the development of a culturally-sensitive decision aid. The study has great promise to improve interactions between healthcare providers and patients and promote unity among the community and healthcare systems.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:09Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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