2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165025
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE USE OF CLINICAL NARRATIVES AS A DEVELOPMENTAL TOOL FOR GRADUATE NURSES
Author(s):
Kanaskie, Mary Louise
Author Details:
Mary Louise Kanaskie, RN MS RNC AOCN, Clinical Nurse Educator, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mkanaskie@psu.edu
Abstract:
Graduate nurses in oncology are faced with many challenges as they learn the role of professional nurse while working in a field that requires specialized knowledge and skill. Graduate nurse internships provide the structure for the acquisition of knowledge and basic skill competency. The purpose of this project is to develop a framework for nurse managers and nurse educators utilizing the clinical narrative as a tool for evaluation and development of graduate nurses. A clinical narrative is a nurseÆs written statement of their nursing practice and can be effectively used to evaluate practice because it describes the practice within a context. According to Benner, graduate nurses function initially as ônovices,ö gaining knowledge and experience through each clinical experience. The clinical narrative provides a tool to dialogue with the graduate nurse about a clinical situation and to provide an opportunity for them to reflect on the situation from a new perspective. The narrative identifies important nursing interventions, makes visible the stages of knowledge development and enhances individualized learning plans. Graduate nurses in an internship program on an oncology unit were asked to write narratives at set intervals. Meetings with the clinical nurse educator and nurse manager were held to discuss their overall growth and development and progress with orientation outcomes. Utilizing the narrative, dialogue occurred which identified individual learning needs. Graduate nurses evaluated the experience of writing and sharing their narratives as valuable, allowing them to reflect on their practice and to identify areas for growth. Managers and educators identified that the narrative made the nurseÆs practice visible and enabled them to evaluate critical thinking skills and more effectively develop individualized learning plans. The success of this project requires the ongoing education of nurses in leadership roles about the effective way to utilize the clinical narrative. Examples of clinical narratives will be shared highlighting the phrases and segments that are most revealing and how to construct questions and statements in the dialogue about them. The impact of this project is far reaching and can also be effectively utilized in the development of experienced RN staff.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE USE OF CLINICAL NARRATIVES AS A DEVELOPMENTAL TOOL FOR GRADUATE NURSESen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKanaskie, Mary Louiseen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Louise Kanaskie, RN MS RNC AOCN, Clinical Nurse Educator, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mkanaskie@psu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165025-
dc.description.abstractGraduate nurses in oncology are faced with many challenges as they learn the role of professional nurse while working in a field that requires specialized knowledge and skill. Graduate nurse internships provide the structure for the acquisition of knowledge and basic skill competency. The purpose of this project is to develop a framework for nurse managers and nurse educators utilizing the clinical narrative as a tool for evaluation and development of graduate nurses. A clinical narrative is a nurseÆs written statement of their nursing practice and can be effectively used to evaluate practice because it describes the practice within a context. According to Benner, graduate nurses function initially as ônovices,ö gaining knowledge and experience through each clinical experience. The clinical narrative provides a tool to dialogue with the graduate nurse about a clinical situation and to provide an opportunity for them to reflect on the situation from a new perspective. The narrative identifies important nursing interventions, makes visible the stages of knowledge development and enhances individualized learning plans. Graduate nurses in an internship program on an oncology unit were asked to write narratives at set intervals. Meetings with the clinical nurse educator and nurse manager were held to discuss their overall growth and development and progress with orientation outcomes. Utilizing the narrative, dialogue occurred which identified individual learning needs. Graduate nurses evaluated the experience of writing and sharing their narratives as valuable, allowing them to reflect on their practice and to identify areas for growth. Managers and educators identified that the narrative made the nurseÆs practice visible and enabled them to evaluate critical thinking skills and more effectively develop individualized learning plans. The success of this project requires the ongoing education of nurses in leadership roles about the effective way to utilize the clinical narrative. Examples of clinical narratives will be shared highlighting the phrases and segments that are most revealing and how to construct questions and statements in the dialogue about them. The impact of this project is far reaching and can also be effectively utilized in the development of experienced RN staff.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:11Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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