2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165035
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ASSESSING NURSES ATTITUDES TOWARD DEATH AND CARING FOR DYING PATIENTS
Author(s):
Lange, Michelle; Thom, Bridgette; Kline, Nancy
Author Details:
Michelle Lange, BSN RN OCN, Clinical Nurse IV, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: langem@mskcc.org; Bridgette Thom, MS; Nancy Kline, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAAN
Abstract:
Oncology nurses care for patients in all stages of disease, from diagnosis to death. Patients at end of life present unique challenges, from both emotional and physical perspectives. As previous research suggests, implementing an educational program tailored to oncology nursesÆ needs may be useful in helping to provide quality end of life care. However, prior to designing, testing, and implementing such a program in a hospital setting, it is necessary to first determine how the nurses employed there feel about caring for dying patients. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the issues that affect, challenge, and concern oncology nurses when caring for dying patients, and to make recommendations for an appropriate educational intervention to be developed and tested. The Nursing Role Effectiveness Model is based on the structure-process- outcome model of quality care. The model analyzes the nurse and patient variables that may impact nursesÆ role performance and subsequently influence patient outcomes. Nurse structural variables, such as education and work experience, are shown to have positive effects on communication, contributing to improved patient outcomes. Registered nurses employed throughout the hospital were invited to complete anonymous, voluntary surveys that consisted of two valid and reliable instruments, the Frommelt Attitude toward Care of the Dying scale (FATCOD form B) and the Death Attitude Profile Revised (DAP-R), and a brief demographic questionnaire. The Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann Whitney U tests were used to compare differences among demographic groups, with post-hoc testing using the Tamhane and Dunnett T3 tests. Preliminary findings indicate that age and years working at the institution appear to be strong influences on attitudes towards death and caring for dying patients. RNs with previous work experience in caring for dying patients have a more positive attitude toward caring for these patients, while less positive attitudes toward caring for dying patients correlated with more fear and avoidance toward death. If the results remain consistent at the time of final analysis, recommendations for an end-of-life educational program will be developed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleASSESSING NURSES ATTITUDES TOWARD DEATH AND CARING FOR DYING PATIENTSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLange, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorThom, Bridgetteen_US
dc.contributor.authorKline, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsMichelle Lange, BSN RN OCN, Clinical Nurse IV, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: langem@mskcc.org; Bridgette Thom, MS; Nancy Kline, PhD, RN, CPNP, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165035-
dc.description.abstractOncology nurses care for patients in all stages of disease, from diagnosis to death. Patients at end of life present unique challenges, from both emotional and physical perspectives. As previous research suggests, implementing an educational program tailored to oncology nursesÆ needs may be useful in helping to provide quality end of life care. However, prior to designing, testing, and implementing such a program in a hospital setting, it is necessary to first determine how the nurses employed there feel about caring for dying patients. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the issues that affect, challenge, and concern oncology nurses when caring for dying patients, and to make recommendations for an appropriate educational intervention to be developed and tested. The Nursing Role Effectiveness Model is based on the structure-process- outcome model of quality care. The model analyzes the nurse and patient variables that may impact nursesÆ role performance and subsequently influence patient outcomes. Nurse structural variables, such as education and work experience, are shown to have positive effects on communication, contributing to improved patient outcomes. Registered nurses employed throughout the hospital were invited to complete anonymous, voluntary surveys that consisted of two valid and reliable instruments, the Frommelt Attitude toward Care of the Dying scale (FATCOD form B) and the Death Attitude Profile Revised (DAP-R), and a brief demographic questionnaire. The Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann Whitney U tests were used to compare differences among demographic groups, with post-hoc testing using the Tamhane and Dunnett T3 tests. Preliminary findings indicate that age and years working at the institution appear to be strong influences on attitudes towards death and caring for dying patients. RNs with previous work experience in caring for dying patients have a more positive attitude toward caring for these patients, while less positive attitudes toward caring for dying patients correlated with more fear and avoidance toward death. If the results remain consistent at the time of final analysis, recommendations for an end-of-life educational program will be developed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:22Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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