2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165036
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PREVENTION OF VAGINAL STENOSIS AFTER PELVIC RADIATION
Author(s):
Law, Ethel Beeling; Ecock, Lauren
Author Details:
Ethel Beeling Law, RN MA OCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Cneter, New York, New York, USA, email: lawe@mskcc.org; Lauren Ecock, RN, BSN
Abstract:
Pelvic radiation is an essential component of the treatment of colorectal and gynecologic cancers. Women who receive radiation will experience varying degrees of vaginal stenosis, beginning as early as four weeks and up to two years after radiation. The diminished dimension of the vagina hinders a thorough pelvic exam for tumor surveillance and the ability to have vaginal penetration. PatientsÆ quality of sexual life may also be affected by persistent dyspareunia, vaginal dryness or bleeding. Studies indicate that dilator use is effective to minimize stenosis. Nurses play a key role in educating patients about its use and encouraging compliance. This abstract reviews the pathophysiology and presentation of vaginal stenosis and describes interventions patients can take to minimize its severity. Conflicting issues related to vaginal stenosis will also be discussed. At this NCI-designated cancer center, patient education is focused on maintaining vaginal health after treatment. The standard is to start life-time dilator use four weeks after radiation is completed. The radiation oncology nurse provides a dilator kit and a fact card on its use. Patients are instructed to use the dilator three times a week for ten minutes at a time. Patients are also instructed on the use of moisturizers and lubricants and on how to perform Kegel exercises. Nurses refer patients to the WomenÆs Health Program to address sexuality issues. In reviewing the evidence about vaginal stenosis, issues that are discussed include: the optimal timing to begin dilator use, the frequency needed, and the use of topical estrogen. By providing an understanding of the rationale for using a dilator and instilling confidence in its use, patients will be more likely to comply, minimizing stenosis, alleviating vaginal symptoms, and enabling them to resume sexual intercourse. Nurses can apply this information in their practice to improve education of patients who have received pelvic radiation. In addition, it is hoped that nurses will be encouraged to undertake research to learn more about how to prevent and treat this problem. As an example, we will discuss a study we will be conducting looking at variations in teaching techniques and frequency of use.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePREVENTION OF VAGINAL STENOSIS AFTER PELVIC RADIATIONen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Ethel Beelingen_US
dc.contributor.authorEcock, Laurenen_US
dc.author.detailsEthel Beeling Law, RN MA OCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Cneter, New York, New York, USA, email: lawe@mskcc.org; Lauren Ecock, RN, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165036-
dc.description.abstractPelvic radiation is an essential component of the treatment of colorectal and gynecologic cancers. Women who receive radiation will experience varying degrees of vaginal stenosis, beginning as early as four weeks and up to two years after radiation. The diminished dimension of the vagina hinders a thorough pelvic exam for tumor surveillance and the ability to have vaginal penetration. PatientsÆ quality of sexual life may also be affected by persistent dyspareunia, vaginal dryness or bleeding. Studies indicate that dilator use is effective to minimize stenosis. Nurses play a key role in educating patients about its use and encouraging compliance. This abstract reviews the pathophysiology and presentation of vaginal stenosis and describes interventions patients can take to minimize its severity. Conflicting issues related to vaginal stenosis will also be discussed. At this NCI-designated cancer center, patient education is focused on maintaining vaginal health after treatment. The standard is to start life-time dilator use four weeks after radiation is completed. The radiation oncology nurse provides a dilator kit and a fact card on its use. Patients are instructed to use the dilator three times a week for ten minutes at a time. Patients are also instructed on the use of moisturizers and lubricants and on how to perform Kegel exercises. Nurses refer patients to the WomenÆs Health Program to address sexuality issues. In reviewing the evidence about vaginal stenosis, issues that are discussed include: the optimal timing to begin dilator use, the frequency needed, and the use of topical estrogen. By providing an understanding of the rationale for using a dilator and instilling confidence in its use, patients will be more likely to comply, minimizing stenosis, alleviating vaginal symptoms, and enabling them to resume sexual intercourse. Nurses can apply this information in their practice to improve education of patients who have received pelvic radiation. In addition, it is hoped that nurses will be encouraged to undertake research to learn more about how to prevent and treat this problem. As an example, we will discuss a study we will be conducting looking at variations in teaching techniques and frequency of use.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:23Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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