EMPOWERING THE ONCOLOGY NURSE AND CARING FOR THE FAMILY CAREGIVER: MEETING CRITICAL NEEDS BY ESTABLISHMENT OF A FORMAL PROGRAM OF BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT ON THE INPATIENT ONCOLOGY WARDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165037
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
EMPOWERING THE ONCOLOGY NURSE AND CARING FOR THE FAMILY CAREGIVER: MEETING CRITICAL NEEDS BY ESTABLISHMENT OF A FORMAL PROGRAM OF BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT ON THE INPATIENT ONCOLOGY WARDS
Author(s):
LeBaron, Virginia
Author Details:
Virginia LeBaron, RN ACNP AOCN, Clinical Assistant Professor; Nurse Practitioner, University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: vlebaron@nursing.arizona.edu
Abstract:
Family caregivers of oncology patients who die in the hospital may be at particular risk for difficult grief and isolation. Commonly they care for patients with recalcitrant disease, who have not elected hospice for a variety of reasons. Consequently, these family caregivers are not automatically enrolled in hospice programs of bereavement follow-up. Oncology nurses caring for patients at end-of-life often express a sense of helplessness, and are in a unique position to promote family caregiver bereavement support. 1) To conduct a pilot project of a formal program of bereavement support targeting caregivers whose loved ones die on the oncology wards. 2) To empower the oncology nurse by providing an opportunity to participate in family caregiver bereavement support. 3) To improve family caregiver satisfaction, because prior to this pilot project no such service existed in the hospital. 1) Developed booklet of educational materials about the grieving process and community/hospital resources. 2) Identify primary caregivers of oncology patients who die on the oncology wards. 3) Oncology nurse provides booklet to primary family caregiver at time of death and completes caregiver contact information card. 4) Family caregiver information is entered into a database for bereavement follow-up. 5) Palliative care nurse practitioner, chaplain, or oncology nurse contact family caregiver: phone call at one week; letter and phone call at 1 month; letter at 6 months; and card at 1 year. 6) Invite all family caregivers to participate in a 6 week hospital- based grief support group led by cancer center chaplains. 6 month and 1 year time points include a brief evaluation survey for the caregiver to return to the project coordinators. Data collection is on-going, but initial survey results suggest this is a helpful intervention for family caregivers. It is hoped that results will serve as a benchmark for implementation of similar bereavement programs throughout the hospital. Supporting family caregivers is an essential role of oncology nursing. Initiation of a simple, effective bereavement program targeting caregivers whose loved ones die in the hospital provides critical assistance to vulnerable caregivers, and enables the oncology nurse to proactively engage in caregiver support at the end-of-life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEMPOWERING THE ONCOLOGY NURSE AND CARING FOR THE FAMILY CAREGIVER: MEETING CRITICAL NEEDS BY ESTABLISHMENT OF A FORMAL PROGRAM OF BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT ON THE INPATIENT ONCOLOGY WARDSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLeBaron, Virginiaen_US
dc.author.detailsVirginia LeBaron, RN ACNP AOCN, Clinical Assistant Professor; Nurse Practitioner, University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: vlebaron@nursing.arizona.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165037-
dc.description.abstractFamily caregivers of oncology patients who die in the hospital may be at particular risk for difficult grief and isolation. Commonly they care for patients with recalcitrant disease, who have not elected hospice for a variety of reasons. Consequently, these family caregivers are not automatically enrolled in hospice programs of bereavement follow-up. Oncology nurses caring for patients at end-of-life often express a sense of helplessness, and are in a unique position to promote family caregiver bereavement support. 1) To conduct a pilot project of a formal program of bereavement support targeting caregivers whose loved ones die on the oncology wards. 2) To empower the oncology nurse by providing an opportunity to participate in family caregiver bereavement support. 3) To improve family caregiver satisfaction, because prior to this pilot project no such service existed in the hospital. 1) Developed booklet of educational materials about the grieving process and community/hospital resources. 2) Identify primary caregivers of oncology patients who die on the oncology wards. 3) Oncology nurse provides booklet to primary family caregiver at time of death and completes caregiver contact information card. 4) Family caregiver information is entered into a database for bereavement follow-up. 5) Palliative care nurse practitioner, chaplain, or oncology nurse contact family caregiver: phone call at one week; letter and phone call at 1 month; letter at 6 months; and card at 1 year. 6) Invite all family caregivers to participate in a 6 week hospital- based grief support group led by cancer center chaplains. 6 month and 1 year time points include a brief evaluation survey for the caregiver to return to the project coordinators. Data collection is on-going, but initial survey results suggest this is a helpful intervention for family caregivers. It is hoped that results will serve as a benchmark for implementation of similar bereavement programs throughout the hospital. Supporting family caregivers is an essential role of oncology nursing. Initiation of a simple, effective bereavement program targeting caregivers whose loved ones die in the hospital provides critical assistance to vulnerable caregivers, and enables the oncology nurse to proactively engage in caregiver support at the end-of-life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:24Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.