PALLIATIVE CARE FROM THE INSIDE OUT: DRAWING UPON EXISTING RESOURCES TO DELIVER EFFECTIVE SERVICES. A PILOT PROJECT OF A PALLIATIVE AND SUPPORTIVE CARE SERVICE (PSCS) ON THE ONCOLOGY UNITS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA MEDICAL CENTER (UMC)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165038
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PALLIATIVE CARE FROM THE INSIDE OUT: DRAWING UPON EXISTING RESOURCES TO DELIVER EFFECTIVE SERVICES. A PILOT PROJECT OF A PALLIATIVE AND SUPPORTIVE CARE SERVICE (PSCS) ON THE ONCOLOGY UNITS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA MEDICAL CENTER (UMC)
Author(s):
LeBaron, Virginia; Bohnenkamp, Susan; Lopez, Ana Maria
Author Details:
Virginia LeBaron, RN ACNP AOCN, Clinical Assistant Professor, Nurse Practitioner, University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: virginialebaron@hotmail.com; Susan Bohnenkamp, MS, APRN-BC, CNS, CCM; Ana Maria Lopez, MD, MPH, FACP, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona
Abstract:
Implicit in patient care is the nurse's interpersonal and empathetic connection with patients and their families. Continual negotiation between professional standards, personal ego integrity, and patient needs within the therapeutic relationship leave the nurse vulnerable to stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout. Effective use of self-care techniques by oncology nurses contribute to improved patient care and increased job satisfaction. Research links stress to physiological conditions like cardiovascular distress, immunosuppression, and gastro-intestinal problems. Stress adversely impacts attention, concentration, critical thinking, and other cognitive functions. Family and social relationships suffer. Stress levels contribute to reduced patient satisfaction, increased employee health costs, increased spending for recruiting, and unnecessary turnover. Meta-analyses of stress research support the effectiveness of interventions. Research suggests that combinations of interventions appear to be more effective than any single intervention. Nurses usually learn self-care strategies through personal experience or the advice of colleagues. This presentation identifies and describes effective self-care techniques employed by oncology nurses. Research supports the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral interventions. This broad class of interventions includes such detachment techniques as distancing and debriefing, guided imagery, assertiveness or other skills training, and establishing professional or personal boundaries. Relaxation training includes such techniques as diaphragmatic breathing, meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, and guided imagery. Once mastered, some techniques may be used unobtrusively while working. Group techniques rely on members sharing and accepting information, assistance, and support with each other. These include formal debriefing, grief support, and Critical Incident Stress Debriefing groups as well as unstructured acts of caring and assistance. Existential techniques try to find meaning in life and suffering. Prayer, personal reflection, meditation, and restoring a life balance represent these strategies. Providing oncology nurses with multiple self-care techniques minimize the consequences of stress, promotes better patient care, and increases their job satisfaction. Future research might focus on matching specific strategies to individual nurses or specific circumstances.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePALLIATIVE CARE FROM THE INSIDE OUT: DRAWING UPON EXISTING RESOURCES TO DELIVER EFFECTIVE SERVICES. A PILOT PROJECT OF A PALLIATIVE AND SUPPORTIVE CARE SERVICE (PSCS) ON THE ONCOLOGY UNITS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA MEDICAL CENTER (UMC)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLeBaron, Virginiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBohnenkamp, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorLopez, Ana Mariaen_US
dc.author.detailsVirginia LeBaron, RN ACNP AOCN, Clinical Assistant Professor, Nurse Practitioner, University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: virginialebaron@hotmail.com; Susan Bohnenkamp, MS, APRN-BC, CNS, CCM; Ana Maria Lopez, MD, MPH, FACP, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165038-
dc.description.abstractImplicit in patient care is the nurse's interpersonal and empathetic connection with patients and their families. Continual negotiation between professional standards, personal ego integrity, and patient needs within the therapeutic relationship leave the nurse vulnerable to stress, compassion fatigue, and burnout. Effective use of self-care techniques by oncology nurses contribute to improved patient care and increased job satisfaction. Research links stress to physiological conditions like cardiovascular distress, immunosuppression, and gastro-intestinal problems. Stress adversely impacts attention, concentration, critical thinking, and other cognitive functions. Family and social relationships suffer. Stress levels contribute to reduced patient satisfaction, increased employee health costs, increased spending for recruiting, and unnecessary turnover. Meta-analyses of stress research support the effectiveness of interventions. Research suggests that combinations of interventions appear to be more effective than any single intervention. Nurses usually learn self-care strategies through personal experience or the advice of colleagues. This presentation identifies and describes effective self-care techniques employed by oncology nurses. Research supports the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral interventions. This broad class of interventions includes such detachment techniques as distancing and debriefing, guided imagery, assertiveness or other skills training, and establishing professional or personal boundaries. Relaxation training includes such techniques as diaphragmatic breathing, meditation, progressive muscle relaxation, and guided imagery. Once mastered, some techniques may be used unobtrusively while working. Group techniques rely on members sharing and accepting information, assistance, and support with each other. These include formal debriefing, grief support, and Critical Incident Stress Debriefing groups as well as unstructured acts of caring and assistance. Existential techniques try to find meaning in life and suffering. Prayer, personal reflection, meditation, and restoring a life balance represent these strategies. Providing oncology nurses with multiple self-care techniques minimize the consequences of stress, promotes better patient care, and increases their job satisfaction. Future research might focus on matching specific strategies to individual nurses or specific circumstances.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:25Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.