2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165044
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CARE DELIVERY ALGORITHM FOR ALTERED FAMILY DYNAMICS
Author(s):
Lohmann, Mary; Cline, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Lohmann, RN, Clinical Nurse, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: marylo49@hotmail.com; Mary Cline, MSN/MPH, APRN, BC-PCM, AOCN
Abstract:
Oncology nurses, in the acute setting, care for very ill patients and their family members on a daily basis. Some of these patients experience long and complicated hospital stays. Providing quality care can be extremely challenging when family dynamics are a disruption to the provision and delivery of care. Family dynamics in a family with a history of poor coping skills can be exacerbated by hospitalization; and within this complex dynamic nursing must be able to develop a plan to provide effective care, decrease anxiety and burn-out among staff members, increase patient and family satisfaction, and facilitate positive communication between the staff, patient, and family. Literature on difficult family dynamics and conflict has identified key behaviors of such families: demands for futile care or unnecessary medical interventions, tyrannical absentee family member, increasing demands and phone calls, splitting of staff, verbal abuse of staff, and increased staff anxiety. By identifying these behaviors a staffing pattern utilizing care delivery algorithm would be developed that would individualize patient care within the context of altered family dynamics. The care delivery algorithm would be initiated early in a patient's admission. Interventions would include, but not be limited to the following: patient assignments to be structured based on the primary care delivery model to provide continuity of care and prevent the splitting of staff by the family; alignment of treatment goals between nursing and the medical team; increased communication among the medical and interdisciplinary team, and nursing staff in coordination of care; and limit setting of the family's disruptive behaviors. Evolution of the care delivery algorithm would be highly individualized due to the complexity of different patients and family dynamics. The nursing staff would meet weekly for education and discussion regarding the case. The staff would also meet post-discharge for discussion and debriefing of the case so any alterations could be made to the plan to better manage identified patients and families in the future.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCARE DELIVERY ALGORITHM FOR ALTERED FAMILY DYNAMICSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLohmann, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorCline, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Lohmann, RN, Clinical Nurse, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: marylo49@hotmail.com; Mary Cline, MSN/MPH, APRN, BC-PCM, AOCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165044-
dc.description.abstractOncology nurses, in the acute setting, care for very ill patients and their family members on a daily basis. Some of these patients experience long and complicated hospital stays. Providing quality care can be extremely challenging when family dynamics are a disruption to the provision and delivery of care. Family dynamics in a family with a history of poor coping skills can be exacerbated by hospitalization; and within this complex dynamic nursing must be able to develop a plan to provide effective care, decrease anxiety and burn-out among staff members, increase patient and family satisfaction, and facilitate positive communication between the staff, patient, and family. Literature on difficult family dynamics and conflict has identified key behaviors of such families: demands for futile care or unnecessary medical interventions, tyrannical absentee family member, increasing demands and phone calls, splitting of staff, verbal abuse of staff, and increased staff anxiety. By identifying these behaviors a staffing pattern utilizing care delivery algorithm would be developed that would individualize patient care within the context of altered family dynamics. The care delivery algorithm would be initiated early in a patient's admission. Interventions would include, but not be limited to the following: patient assignments to be structured based on the primary care delivery model to provide continuity of care and prevent the splitting of staff by the family; alignment of treatment goals between nursing and the medical team; increased communication among the medical and interdisciplinary team, and nursing staff in coordination of care; and limit setting of the family's disruptive behaviors. Evolution of the care delivery algorithm would be highly individualized due to the complexity of different patients and family dynamics. The nursing staff would meet weekly for education and discussion regarding the case. The staff would also meet post-discharge for discussion and debriefing of the case so any alterations could be made to the plan to better manage identified patients and families in the future.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:31Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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