2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165054
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ONCOLOGY NURSE AS A COLON SCREENING NURSE NAVIGATOR
Author(s):
Marinelli, Charlene; Katurakes, Nora; Donnelly, Sandra; Graham, Helen F.
Author Details:
Charlene Marinelli, RN BSN OCN, Community Health Outreach Nurse, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health Services, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: cmarinelli@christianacare.org; Nora Katurakes, RN, MSN, OCN; Sandra Donnelly, RN, OCN
Abstract:
Colorectal cancer deaths in Delaware are the third highest. Mortality is higher among African Americans then Caucasians. Colonoscopy is a reliable screening test. Few Delawareans take advantage of this life saving test. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) 1999 data reported, 45% Caucasians and 39.6% African American Delawareans ever having a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy screening. In 2002, the Delaware Cancer Consortium initiated a comprehensive statewide community-focused colorectal cancer screening program. A full time Colorectal Screening Nurse Navigator (CRCNN) was housed in each major health system. Christiana Care Health System (CCHS) hired 2 part-time Oncology Certified Nurses specializing in community outreach to provide culturally sensitive outreach and recruitment, ensure screening access and scheduling, monitor screening compliance, and ensure prompt clinical evaluation and follow-up to positive testing. The CCHS CRCNN shared their oncology nursing expertise to create program materials and recruit individuals 50 years and older, mostly African Americans, uninsured living in geographic areas determined to be high risk. Assistance was provided to overcome barriers to screening e.g., if uninsured, enroll in the state funded colon screening program. Partnerships were fostered with community organizations and the medical community to assist with referrals. The CCHS CRCNN participated in the development and implementation of a web-based data system designed to assist in case management and tracking through intake, planning, screening and follow up. BRFSS data 2004 reported a statistically significant increase in Caucasians and African Americans (62.3% and 58.4% respectively) ever having a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy. CCHS CRCNN case managed 690 individuals. A portion (230) were found to have insurmountable barriers (comorbid conditions and unable to contact) could not complete screening. Colonoscopy was completed by 274 (40%) individuals, 85 were enrolled in the state funded program, and 86 were African American. Using the web-based data system, 166 individuals continue to be case managed with new enrollees added daily. Oncology nurses contribute key attributes and experiences to increase public awareness and educate about colon cancer. Further, they assist with access to insurance and navigate difficult or complex families from diverse populations to increase screening rates in Delaware.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleONCOLOGY NURSE AS A COLON SCREENING NURSE NAVIGATORen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMarinelli, Charleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorKaturakes, Noraen_US
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Sandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Helen F.en_US
dc.author.detailsCharlene Marinelli, RN BSN OCN, Community Health Outreach Nurse, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health Services, Newark, Delaware, USA, email: cmarinelli@christianacare.org; Nora Katurakes, RN, MSN, OCN; Sandra Donnelly, RN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165054-
dc.description.abstractColorectal cancer deaths in Delaware are the third highest. Mortality is higher among African Americans then Caucasians. Colonoscopy is a reliable screening test. Few Delawareans take advantage of this life saving test. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) 1999 data reported, 45% Caucasians and 39.6% African American Delawareans ever having a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy screening. In 2002, the Delaware Cancer Consortium initiated a comprehensive statewide community-focused colorectal cancer screening program. A full time Colorectal Screening Nurse Navigator (CRCNN) was housed in each major health system. Christiana Care Health System (CCHS) hired 2 part-time Oncology Certified Nurses specializing in community outreach to provide culturally sensitive outreach and recruitment, ensure screening access and scheduling, monitor screening compliance, and ensure prompt clinical evaluation and follow-up to positive testing. The CCHS CRCNN shared their oncology nursing expertise to create program materials and recruit individuals 50 years and older, mostly African Americans, uninsured living in geographic areas determined to be high risk. Assistance was provided to overcome barriers to screening e.g., if uninsured, enroll in the state funded colon screening program. Partnerships were fostered with community organizations and the medical community to assist with referrals. The CCHS CRCNN participated in the development and implementation of a web-based data system designed to assist in case management and tracking through intake, planning, screening and follow up. BRFSS data 2004 reported a statistically significant increase in Caucasians and African Americans (62.3% and 58.4% respectively) ever having a sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy. CCHS CRCNN case managed 690 individuals. A portion (230) were found to have insurmountable barriers (comorbid conditions and unable to contact) could not complete screening. Colonoscopy was completed by 274 (40%) individuals, 85 were enrolled in the state funded program, and 86 were African American. Using the web-based data system, 166 individuals continue to be case managed with new enrollees added daily. Oncology nurses contribute key attributes and experiences to increase public awareness and educate about colon cancer. Further, they assist with access to insurance and navigate difficult or complex families from diverse populations to increase screening rates in Delaware.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:42Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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