2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165055
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
BRINGING A BEREAVEMENT PROGRAM BACK TO LIFE
Author(s):
Marshall, Grace
Author Details:
Grace Marshall, RN OCN, Registered Nurse, Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: marshalg@karmanos.org
Abstract:
Oncology nurses deal with multiple deaths, providing care for patients, as well as families/caregivers. After a patient death a nurse is expected to continue working. Ineffective coping mechanisms may be adopted leading to burnout and harmful behaviors. Assisting nurses in dealing with death and processing of grief guards against burnout, leading to better patient care. Interventions include attending funerals, holding alternative rituals, calling families, posting photographs and/or sending cards. On our BMT unit, nurses deal with both adult and pediatric deaths. In the past, a structured bereavement program had been valued and several nurses participated in sending sympathy cards initially, at 6 months and at one year. With the turn over of involved staff the project dissolved. An original member, an RN with 23 years of oncology experience returned to the BMT unit after a 2-year absence and noticed that staff were struggling with grief issues. A proposal for reinitiating the cards was brought to the unit Nurse Practice committee and unanimously accepted. The Unit CNS gave a presentation on Nurses Grief, expanding nurses' knowledge about the concept and described bereavement programs as one effective intervention. Bereavement cards, including pediatric specific were purchased. The lead nurse initiated the sympathy card and notified staff, enabling all to personally sign their names and express condolences. With the past program one nurse was responsible for cards each month, while currently the project leader asks nurses closest to the family to choose and initiate a card. In the past patients were missed if they didn't expire on the BMT unit, therefore a data manager provides the RN with a monthly patient expiration list. Patient photographs and cards are posted in the nursesÆ conference room and then placed in a unit scrapbook. Previous participants voice gratitude for re-initiation of the program, while nurses new to the experience provide positive feedback. Bereaved families convey verbal and written appreciation for the thoughtful gesture. Bereavement programs allow oncology nurses ways to express and resolve their grief and can be tailored to meet individual staff/unit needs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBRINGING A BEREAVEMENT PROGRAM BACK TO LIFEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Graceen_US
dc.author.detailsGrace Marshall, RN OCN, Registered Nurse, Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan, USA, email: marshalg@karmanos.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165055-
dc.description.abstractOncology nurses deal with multiple deaths, providing care for patients, as well as families/caregivers. After a patient death a nurse is expected to continue working. Ineffective coping mechanisms may be adopted leading to burnout and harmful behaviors. Assisting nurses in dealing with death and processing of grief guards against burnout, leading to better patient care. Interventions include attending funerals, holding alternative rituals, calling families, posting photographs and/or sending cards. On our BMT unit, nurses deal with both adult and pediatric deaths. In the past, a structured bereavement program had been valued and several nurses participated in sending sympathy cards initially, at 6 months and at one year. With the turn over of involved staff the project dissolved. An original member, an RN with 23 years of oncology experience returned to the BMT unit after a 2-year absence and noticed that staff were struggling with grief issues. A proposal for reinitiating the cards was brought to the unit Nurse Practice committee and unanimously accepted. The Unit CNS gave a presentation on Nurses Grief, expanding nurses' knowledge about the concept and described bereavement programs as one effective intervention. Bereavement cards, including pediatric specific were purchased. The lead nurse initiated the sympathy card and notified staff, enabling all to personally sign their names and express condolences. With the past program one nurse was responsible for cards each month, while currently the project leader asks nurses closest to the family to choose and initiate a card. In the past patients were missed if they didn't expire on the BMT unit, therefore a data manager provides the RN with a monthly patient expiration list. Patient photographs and cards are posted in the nursesÆ conference room and then placed in a unit scrapbook. Previous participants voice gratitude for re-initiation of the program, while nurses new to the experience provide positive feedback. Bereaved families convey verbal and written appreciation for the thoughtful gesture. Bereavement programs allow oncology nurses ways to express and resolve their grief and can be tailored to meet individual staff/unit needs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:43Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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