MANAGING THE PATIENT AT RISK FOR LUNG CANCER THROUGH CT LUNG SCREENING IN A COMMUNITY HOSPITAL SETTING

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165060
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
MANAGING THE PATIENT AT RISK FOR LUNG CANCER THROUGH CT LUNG SCREENING IN A COMMUNITY HOSPITAL SETTING
Author(s):
Matten, Pamela; Fischel, Richard; Vu, Dan; Wong, Sui-Fun
Author Details:
Pamela Matten,RN OCN, Nurse Navigator Lung Cancer Program, St. Joseph Hospital Regional Cancer Center, Orange, California, USA, email: pmatten@stjoe.org; Richard Fischel, MD, PhD; Dan Vu, MD, Moran Rowen & Dorsey, Orange, California; Siu-Fun Wong, PharmD, FASHP, FCSHP, Western University, Pomona, California
Abstract:
As the most lethal cancer in the world, lung cancer presents an enormous health care challenge. The key to reversing the diseaseÆs lethality may be in evidence-based computerized tomography (CT) imaging in early management of lung cancer. New clinical evidence from the International Early Lung Cancer Action Project (I-ELCAP) suggests that CT screening can detect curable lung tumors. With detection and surgical removal of early lung cancers, 92% of patients may live 10 years. The aim of this program is to detect early stage lung cancer that is treatable and potentially curable by implementing a low-cost CT lung-screening program in a community hospital setting, focusing on individuals at-risk for developing lung cancer. Cost is a 1-time fee of $125.00. At risk individuals have smoked at least 20 pack years and are at least 50 years of age. An oncology certified nurse implements the Lung Screening Program, following patients for at least 2 years. At weekly multidisciplinary conferences, the nurse facilitates case presentations of suspicious lung nodules. The core group includes the nurse, a thoracic surgeon, and chest radiologist. When lung cancer or other abnormalities are found, the nurse coordinates care and additional work-ups as needed. Over a period of 23 months, 245 patients have been screened for lung cancer with 8 positive findings. Six cancers were confirmed NSCLC (50% early stage), one lyposarcoma, one B-cell lymphoma. Three patients had early stage lung cancer, treated with video-assisted thoracic surgery. The St. Joseph Hospital Lung Program was recognized as a ôbest practiceö model, by the 2005 Advisory Board CompanyÆs RoundTable annual symposium, based on our CT screening approach to early diagnosis. Community hospital based low-cost CT lung screening programs, led by multidisciplinary teams can maximize the opportunity to detect early stage lung cancer. Finding lung cancer in an early stage can help save lives or improve patient outcomes for lung cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMANAGING THE PATIENT AT RISK FOR LUNG CANCER THROUGH CT LUNG SCREENING IN A COMMUNITY HOSPITAL SETTINGen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMatten, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorFischel, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorVu, Danen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, Sui-Funen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Matten,RN OCN, Nurse Navigator Lung Cancer Program, St. Joseph Hospital Regional Cancer Center, Orange, California, USA, email: pmatten@stjoe.org; Richard Fischel, MD, PhD; Dan Vu, MD, Moran Rowen & Dorsey, Orange, California; Siu-Fun Wong, PharmD, FASHP, FCSHP, Western University, Pomona, Californiaen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165060-
dc.description.abstractAs the most lethal cancer in the world, lung cancer presents an enormous health care challenge. The key to reversing the diseaseÆs lethality may be in evidence-based computerized tomography (CT) imaging in early management of lung cancer. New clinical evidence from the International Early Lung Cancer Action Project (I-ELCAP) suggests that CT screening can detect curable lung tumors. With detection and surgical removal of early lung cancers, 92% of patients may live 10 years. The aim of this program is to detect early stage lung cancer that is treatable and potentially curable by implementing a low-cost CT lung-screening program in a community hospital setting, focusing on individuals at-risk for developing lung cancer. Cost is a 1-time fee of $125.00. At risk individuals have smoked at least 20 pack years and are at least 50 years of age. An oncology certified nurse implements the Lung Screening Program, following patients for at least 2 years. At weekly multidisciplinary conferences, the nurse facilitates case presentations of suspicious lung nodules. The core group includes the nurse, a thoracic surgeon, and chest radiologist. When lung cancer or other abnormalities are found, the nurse coordinates care and additional work-ups as needed. Over a period of 23 months, 245 patients have been screened for lung cancer with 8 positive findings. Six cancers were confirmed NSCLC (50% early stage), one lyposarcoma, one B-cell lymphoma. Three patients had early stage lung cancer, treated with video-assisted thoracic surgery. The St. Joseph Hospital Lung Program was recognized as a ôbest practiceö model, by the 2005 Advisory Board CompanyÆs RoundTable annual symposium, based on our CT screening approach to early diagnosis. Community hospital based low-cost CT lung screening programs, led by multidisciplinary teams can maximize the opportunity to detect early stage lung cancer. Finding lung cancer in an early stage can help save lives or improve patient outcomes for lung cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:48Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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