2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165064
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ORGANIZING A HEAD & NECK CANCER SCREENING DAY: THE ONCOLOGY NURSE'S ROLE
Author(s):
Mckiernan, Janet; Solan, Jill
Author Details:
Janet Mckiernan, RN BSN OCN, Clinical Nurse IV, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: mckiernj@mskcc.org; Jill Solan, RN, MSN, ANP
Abstract:
More than 30,000 Americans will be diagnosed with head and neck (H&N) cancer in 2006 and approximately 7,000 will die of the disease. The 5 year disease-free survival has not significantly improved since the 1950Æs and may be less than 50% depending on stage of disease. Cancer screenings have demonstrated improved mortality rates for a number of cancers. The H&N region can be readily examined making cancer screenings feasible to improve early detection thereby reducing mortality. Oncology nurses can play a significant role in organizing H&N cancer screening clinics. This presentation will review the steps involved for an oncology nurse to plan and implement a H&N cancer screening day. At this NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center, a free H&N cancer screening has been held annually for 8 years. Experienced H&N oncology nurses coordinate the screening day within the H&N surgical practice team. Initially the date for the screening day is secured. Publicity for the event is coordinated with public affairs and graphics. Commitments for assistance with smoking cessation and nutritional counseling are prearranged as these services are available throughout the screening hours. Preparations also include obtaining registration screening forms, training the administrative support staff about the registration process and flow, and meeting with the surgical fellows to discuss the details of the H&N examination and documentation. Finally, the nurse tallies the screening data and sends a follow-up letter to all participants with an abnormal exam requiring further evaluation. Over the past 8 years, 94 to 173 individuals have been screened each year within a 4 hour period. Abnormal examinations have ranged from 18 to 35% with findings including oral leukoplakia lesions, skin lesions, thyroid nodules, cervical lymphadenopathy and complaints of dysphagia and hoarseness with a recommendation for further evaluation. A supraglottic carcinoma was detected at one screening day with instructions provided for immediate medical attention. This presentation will discuss the process involved to coordinate a free screening day and will also review the screening results. This process could be applied to other oncology screenings and may assist oncology nurses planning a community screening day.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleORGANIZING A HEAD & NECK CANCER SCREENING DAY: THE ONCOLOGY NURSE'S ROLEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMckiernan, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.authorSolan, Jillen_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Mckiernan, RN BSN OCN, Clinical Nurse IV, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: mckiernj@mskcc.org; Jill Solan, RN, MSN, ANPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165064-
dc.description.abstractMore than 30,000 Americans will be diagnosed with head and neck (H&N) cancer in 2006 and approximately 7,000 will die of the disease. The 5 year disease-free survival has not significantly improved since the 1950Æs and may be less than 50% depending on stage of disease. Cancer screenings have demonstrated improved mortality rates for a number of cancers. The H&N region can be readily examined making cancer screenings feasible to improve early detection thereby reducing mortality. Oncology nurses can play a significant role in organizing H&N cancer screening clinics. This presentation will review the steps involved for an oncology nurse to plan and implement a H&N cancer screening day. At this NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center, a free H&N cancer screening has been held annually for 8 years. Experienced H&N oncology nurses coordinate the screening day within the H&N surgical practice team. Initially the date for the screening day is secured. Publicity for the event is coordinated with public affairs and graphics. Commitments for assistance with smoking cessation and nutritional counseling are prearranged as these services are available throughout the screening hours. Preparations also include obtaining registration screening forms, training the administrative support staff about the registration process and flow, and meeting with the surgical fellows to discuss the details of the H&N examination and documentation. Finally, the nurse tallies the screening data and sends a follow-up letter to all participants with an abnormal exam requiring further evaluation. Over the past 8 years, 94 to 173 individuals have been screened each year within a 4 hour period. Abnormal examinations have ranged from 18 to 35% with findings including oral leukoplakia lesions, skin lesions, thyroid nodules, cervical lymphadenopathy and complaints of dysphagia and hoarseness with a recommendation for further evaluation. A supraglottic carcinoma was detected at one screening day with instructions provided for immediate medical attention. This presentation will discuss the process involved to coordinate a free screening day and will also review the screening results. This process could be applied to other oncology screenings and may assist oncology nurses planning a community screening day.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:11:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:11:53Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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