THE IMPACT OF DIETARY RESTRICTIONS ON THE RISK FOR INFECTION IN THE NEUTROPENIC ONCOLOGY PATIENT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165071
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE IMPACT OF DIETARY RESTRICTIONS ON THE RISK FOR INFECTION IN THE NEUTROPENIC ONCOLOGY PATIENT
Author(s):
Moeller, Linda; Abbott, Linda; Bohlken, Deb; Suchanek, Laura
Author Details:
Linda Moeller, RN BSN, Staff Nurse, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, USA, email: linda-moeller@uiowa.edu; Linda Abbott, MSN, AOCN, CWON; Deb Bohlken, RN, OCN; Laura Suchanek, RN, MA, AOCN
Abstract:
Myelosuppresive chemotherapy is the gold standard in treating oncology patients. Neutropenia is an anticipated consequence of the treatment. In an effort to protect patients from infection, "neutropenia precautions" are often implemented. One component of neutropenia precautions is to restrict the patientÆs intake of fresh fruits/ vegetables. The purpose of this project was to determine if evidence supports restricting patientÆs intake of fresh fruits/vegetables to prevent infection. A literature search was conducted in the Spring, 2005 and revealed that diet cannot be directly linked to the incidence of bloodstream infections. Research suggests that safe food handling/preparation is more likely to reduce food borne infection than restrictions of fresh fruits/vegetables. The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality Care was utilized. Strategies include: 1. Forming a multidisciplinary team 2. Use of an Opinion Leader 3. Educating nursing, medical, and dietary staff 4. Obtaining buy-in from key stakeholders 5. Piloting the practice change on a clinical unit and 6. Modifying hospital policies. Proposed practice changes include: 1. Implementation of an education program for nursing/medical staff; 2. Restriction of only select foods; 3. Education of patients about safe food handling/ preparation; and 4. Modification of neutropenia precautions policy. Blood stream infection rates compared before the practice change and for a year after showed there was no increase in infection rates for patients. A patient education tool was piloted on the practice change unit. Patient input was incorporated into the material maintaining a 6-8th grade reading level. Modification of policy is pending and the practice change will be implemented throughout Cancer Center and hospital. By not restricting food choices and allowing patients a wider range of safe foods to choose from during cancer treatment, patient's QOL, performance status, and treatment outcomes will be positively impacted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE IMPACT OF DIETARY RESTRICTIONS ON THE RISK FOR INFECTION IN THE NEUTROPENIC ONCOLOGY PATIENTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoeller, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbbott, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBohlken, Deben_US
dc.contributor.authorSuchanek, Lauraen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Moeller, RN BSN, Staff Nurse, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, USA, email: linda-moeller@uiowa.edu; Linda Abbott, MSN, AOCN, CWON; Deb Bohlken, RN, OCN; Laura Suchanek, RN, MA, AOCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165071-
dc.description.abstractMyelosuppresive chemotherapy is the gold standard in treating oncology patients. Neutropenia is an anticipated consequence of the treatment. In an effort to protect patients from infection, "neutropenia precautions" are often implemented. One component of neutropenia precautions is to restrict the patientÆs intake of fresh fruits/ vegetables. The purpose of this project was to determine if evidence supports restricting patientÆs intake of fresh fruits/vegetables to prevent infection. A literature search was conducted in the Spring, 2005 and revealed that diet cannot be directly linked to the incidence of bloodstream infections. Research suggests that safe food handling/preparation is more likely to reduce food borne infection than restrictions of fresh fruits/vegetables. The Iowa Model of Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Quality Care was utilized. Strategies include: 1. Forming a multidisciplinary team 2. Use of an Opinion Leader 3. Educating nursing, medical, and dietary staff 4. Obtaining buy-in from key stakeholders 5. Piloting the practice change on a clinical unit and 6. Modifying hospital policies. Proposed practice changes include: 1. Implementation of an education program for nursing/medical staff; 2. Restriction of only select foods; 3. Education of patients about safe food handling/ preparation; and 4. Modification of neutropenia precautions policy. Blood stream infection rates compared before the practice change and for a year after showed there was no increase in infection rates for patients. A patient education tool was piloted on the practice change unit. Patient input was incorporated into the material maintaining a 6-8th grade reading level. Modification of policy is pending and the practice change will be implemented throughout Cancer Center and hospital. By not restricting food choices and allowing patients a wider range of safe foods to choose from during cancer treatment, patient's QOL, performance status, and treatment outcomes will be positively impacted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:00Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.