UTILIZING A SCENIC CURTAIN TO DECREASE THE PATIENT'S ANXIETY AND ANGER DURING INITIAL CHEMOTHERAPY TREATMENT

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165072
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
UTILIZING A SCENIC CURTAIN TO DECREASE THE PATIENT'S ANXIETY AND ANGER DURING INITIAL CHEMOTHERAPY TREATMENT
Author(s):
Moeller, Kimberly; Murvine, Sherry; Began, Christopher
Author Details:
Kimberly Moeller, RN, BSN, OCN, staff nurse, Summa Health System, Akron, Ohio, USA, email: Jkzrnm@sbcglobal.net; Sherry Murvine, RN, BSN, Hospice and Palliative Care of Visiting Nurse Service, Akron, Ohio; Christopher Began, RN, BSN, Aultman Hospital, Canton, Ohio
Abstract:
The diagnosis of cancer and fear of the unknown often produces physiological distress, such as increased levels of anxiety and anger. Anxiety can be a major factor in anticipatory nausea and vomiting, substantially interfering with the patient's quality of life. Evidence based research has revealed distraction intervention has been effective in reducing the levels of anxiety and anger. Alleviating patient stress and anxiety is a significant clinical goal because anxiety is both: an important negative health outcome, and has a variety of detrimental psychological, physical, and behavioral effects that worsen other outcomes. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of a tranquil ocean Serene View curtain as a distraction intervention to reduce anger and anxiety in patientÆs receiving initial chemotherapy in the out-patient setting. Dorothy Johnson's conceptual framework guided this study. One goal is for the patient to obtain function at the optimal level. Johnson understood the client is stressed by either internal or external stimuli which disrupt this equilibrium. The goal of nursing is to return the system to balance and support the process by which it is obtained. The literature review also showed that Florence Nightingale believed nurses need to put patients in the best possible condition to allow health to be restored and prevention of cure and disease. The method utilized was a quantitative experimental design. 29 participants were randomized into either the control or experimental group and received a two-pocket coded packet. Each packet contained a twenty question pre and post test survey along with a pre and post test visual analog scale. Both groups revealed significant decreases in anxiety as evidenced by survey questions, VAS measures, blood pressures, and heart rates. These decreases could not solely be attributed by the scenic curtain. It is important to nursing that regardless of the intervention, initial chemotherapy produces anxiety.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUTILIZING A SCENIC CURTAIN TO DECREASE THE PATIENT'S ANXIETY AND ANGER DURING INITIAL CHEMOTHERAPY TREATMENTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoeller, Kimberlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurvine, Sherryen_US
dc.contributor.authorBegan, Christopheren_US
dc.author.detailsKimberly Moeller, RN, BSN, OCN, staff nurse, Summa Health System, Akron, Ohio, USA, email: Jkzrnm@sbcglobal.net; Sherry Murvine, RN, BSN, Hospice and Palliative Care of Visiting Nurse Service, Akron, Ohio; Christopher Began, RN, BSN, Aultman Hospital, Canton, Ohioen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165072-
dc.description.abstractThe diagnosis of cancer and fear of the unknown often produces physiological distress, such as increased levels of anxiety and anger. Anxiety can be a major factor in anticipatory nausea and vomiting, substantially interfering with the patient's quality of life. Evidence based research has revealed distraction intervention has been effective in reducing the levels of anxiety and anger. Alleviating patient stress and anxiety is a significant clinical goal because anxiety is both: an important negative health outcome, and has a variety of detrimental psychological, physical, and behavioral effects that worsen other outcomes. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of a tranquil ocean Serene View curtain as a distraction intervention to reduce anger and anxiety in patientÆs receiving initial chemotherapy in the out-patient setting. Dorothy Johnson's conceptual framework guided this study. One goal is for the patient to obtain function at the optimal level. Johnson understood the client is stressed by either internal or external stimuli which disrupt this equilibrium. The goal of nursing is to return the system to balance and support the process by which it is obtained. The literature review also showed that Florence Nightingale believed nurses need to put patients in the best possible condition to allow health to be restored and prevention of cure and disease. The method utilized was a quantitative experimental design. 29 participants were randomized into either the control or experimental group and received a two-pocket coded packet. Each packet contained a twenty question pre and post test survey along with a pre and post test visual analog scale. Both groups revealed significant decreases in anxiety as evidenced by survey questions, VAS measures, blood pressures, and heart rates. These decreases could not solely be attributed by the scenic curtain. It is important to nursing that regardless of the intervention, initial chemotherapy produces anxiety.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:01Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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