NEW GRADUATE NURSES IN THE OUTPATIENT TREATMENT UNIT- NEW APPROACHES TO STAFFING

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165089
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
NEW GRADUATE NURSES IN THE OUTPATIENT TREATMENT UNIT- NEW APPROACHES TO STAFFING
Author(s):
Paolilli, Diane; Rodriguez, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Diane Paolilli, RN MSN AOCN, CNS, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: paolilld@mskcc.org; Elizabeth Rodriguez, MA, RN
Abstract:
In light of the current nursing shortage and increasing volume of patient treatments in outpatient care at this institution, seeking new approaches to hiring, orienting and retaining nurses to work in ambulatory oncology is paramount. Historically only nurses with two years oncology experience were hired. A task force formed to consider new approaches to hiring including the recruitment of new graduate and oncology nanve nurse to the outpatient treatment unit. A key goal of the task force was to provide the support necessary to ensure the success of the novice nurse. The task force designed a comprehensive program to hire, educate and support the novice within the outpatient setting offering these nurses a ôBridge to Oncologyö. The group developed a program with a multi-faceted approach based upon a review of the literature and consultation with experts both within and outside the institution. Eligibility criteria and a process for interviewing were developed in collaboration with nurse recruitment. The task force divided into two groups, one dedicated to developing a preceptor program, the other focused on the development of an orientation pathway. The task force utilized several different strategies to influence the organizational culture as it relates to hiring novice nurses in the outpatient setting. Initiatives to support change included inservicing for the current staff, training for the precepting nurse, and ongoing support for the new nurse and preceptor scheduled throughout the first year. Expanding the recruitment pool may be an effective way to address staffing concerns. To date seven nurses have successfully completed this program. The success rate of these nurses suggests that new graduate nurses are an effective resource for an outpatient treatment unit. Based on evaluation feedback a structured and focused orientation are necessary components to ensure the success of the new graduate nurse. Given our experience to date, the program continues to be offered on a biannual basis. Future directions may include application of this model to other positions within the outpatient setting.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNEW GRADUATE NURSES IN THE OUTPATIENT TREATMENT UNIT- NEW APPROACHES TO STAFFINGen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPaolilli, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsDiane Paolilli, RN MSN AOCN, CNS, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: paolilld@mskcc.org; Elizabeth Rodriguez, MA, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165089-
dc.description.abstractIn light of the current nursing shortage and increasing volume of patient treatments in outpatient care at this institution, seeking new approaches to hiring, orienting and retaining nurses to work in ambulatory oncology is paramount. Historically only nurses with two years oncology experience were hired. A task force formed to consider new approaches to hiring including the recruitment of new graduate and oncology nanve nurse to the outpatient treatment unit. A key goal of the task force was to provide the support necessary to ensure the success of the novice nurse. The task force designed a comprehensive program to hire, educate and support the novice within the outpatient setting offering these nurses a ôBridge to Oncologyö. The group developed a program with a multi-faceted approach based upon a review of the literature and consultation with experts both within and outside the institution. Eligibility criteria and a process for interviewing were developed in collaboration with nurse recruitment. The task force divided into two groups, one dedicated to developing a preceptor program, the other focused on the development of an orientation pathway. The task force utilized several different strategies to influence the organizational culture as it relates to hiring novice nurses in the outpatient setting. Initiatives to support change included inservicing for the current staff, training for the precepting nurse, and ongoing support for the new nurse and preceptor scheduled throughout the first year. Expanding the recruitment pool may be an effective way to address staffing concerns. To date seven nurses have successfully completed this program. The success rate of these nurses suggests that new graduate nurses are an effective resource for an outpatient treatment unit. Based on evaluation feedback a structured and focused orientation are necessary components to ensure the success of the new graduate nurse. Given our experience to date, the program continues to be offered on a biannual basis. Future directions may include application of this model to other positions within the outpatient setting.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:20Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.