ADDRESSING THE CHALLENGE OF INCREASING FRONTLINE ONCOLOGY NURSES' INVOLVEMENT IN COMMITTEE WORK

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165093
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ADDRESSING THE CHALLENGE OF INCREASING FRONTLINE ONCOLOGY NURSES' INVOLVEMENT IN COMMITTEE WORK
Author(s):
Pedulla, Lillian; Fonteyn, Marsha; McDonough, Katherine
Author Details:
Lillian Pedulla, RN BSN MSN, Clinical Informatics Specialist, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: lillianpedulla@dfci.harvard.edu; Marsha Fonteyn, PhD, RN; Katherine McDonough, RN, MS, The McDonough Group, Norwood, Massachusetts
Abstract:
Many health care institutions struggle with the dilemma of how to attract and sustain staff nurse participation in committee work. Based on shared decision-making, the Nursing Council at our academic ambulatory oncology center inherently depends upon nursing staff involvement. Several committee chairpersons reporting into the Council expressed concern regarding low attendance and participation among the staff nurses. Data on staff nursesÆ membership in hospital based committee work showed that approximately 10% were active members of multiple hospital wide committees, while the remaining 90% had minimal to no involvement. To address the problem of low staff nurse involvement on committees, the Council asked the Evidence Based Practice (EBP) Committee to explore two primary questions: What factors motivate nursing staff to become actively involved in committee work? What factors impede participation? The EBP Committee found minimal evidence in published nursing literature to answer these questions. Consequently, the committee decided to obtain (expert opinion) evidence by implementing focus groups interviews with nursing staff who were active members of multiple committees. The EBP Committee developed a series of open-ended questions. Nurses belonging to multiple committees were invited to attend one of two ninety-minute, focus group sessions. Two EBP Committee members facilitated the sessions and a third member took notes. By consensus, the sessions were audio-taped. Synthesis of information from these sources provided detailed information about what factors motivate and impede nursing staff involvement on committees. The project successfully provided answers to the two questions posed to the EBP Committee. Several recommendations were presented to the Nursing Council, including the re-examination of the Council and committee structure. To date, numerous practice changes have occurred and have contributed to increased staff participation. Information gained from focus groups can be an excellent source of evidence when there is little available in the published literature. The description of how we collected new evidence through focus groups will be useful to nurses in a variety of specialties and/or settings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleADDRESSING THE CHALLENGE OF INCREASING FRONTLINE ONCOLOGY NURSES' INVOLVEMENT IN COMMITTEE WORKen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPedulla, Lillianen_US
dc.contributor.authorFonteyn, Marshaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcDonough, Katherineen_US
dc.author.detailsLillian Pedulla, RN BSN MSN, Clinical Informatics Specialist, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: lillianpedulla@dfci.harvard.edu; Marsha Fonteyn, PhD, RN; Katherine McDonough, RN, MS, The McDonough Group, Norwood, Massachusettsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165093-
dc.description.abstractMany health care institutions struggle with the dilemma of how to attract and sustain staff nurse participation in committee work. Based on shared decision-making, the Nursing Council at our academic ambulatory oncology center inherently depends upon nursing staff involvement. Several committee chairpersons reporting into the Council expressed concern regarding low attendance and participation among the staff nurses. Data on staff nursesÆ membership in hospital based committee work showed that approximately 10% were active members of multiple hospital wide committees, while the remaining 90% had minimal to no involvement. To address the problem of low staff nurse involvement on committees, the Council asked the Evidence Based Practice (EBP) Committee to explore two primary questions: What factors motivate nursing staff to become actively involved in committee work? What factors impede participation? The EBP Committee found minimal evidence in published nursing literature to answer these questions. Consequently, the committee decided to obtain (expert opinion) evidence by implementing focus groups interviews with nursing staff who were active members of multiple committees. The EBP Committee developed a series of open-ended questions. Nurses belonging to multiple committees were invited to attend one of two ninety-minute, focus group sessions. Two EBP Committee members facilitated the sessions and a third member took notes. By consensus, the sessions were audio-taped. Synthesis of information from these sources provided detailed information about what factors motivate and impede nursing staff involvement on committees. The project successfully provided answers to the two questions posed to the EBP Committee. Several recommendations were presented to the Nursing Council, including the re-examination of the Council and committee structure. To date, numerous practice changes have occurred and have contributed to increased staff participation. Information gained from focus groups can be an excellent source of evidence when there is little available in the published literature. The description of how we collected new evidence through focus groups will be useful to nurses in a variety of specialties and/or settings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:24Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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