2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165094
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ASSESSING PATIENT FLOW IN AN AMBULATORY ONCOLOGY SETTING
Author(s):
Phillips, Shannon
Author Details:
Shannon Phillips, MS RN AOCNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, Rochester, New York, USA, email: ShannonPhillips@urmc.rochester.edu
Abstract:
The flow of patients through ambulatory areas is central to patient and staff satisfaction, as well as reimbursement issues related to room/chair turn around time. Patient flow involves a multidisciplinary group approach, with cooperation needed from nurses, providers, clinical technicians, secretarial staff, and patients. The purpose of this project was to evaluate patient flow and quantify wait times in an outpatient cancer clinic and treatment center in Western New York. Data were collected on 442 patient visits during 35 business days. A student unobtrusively recorded the time the patient was taken into the clinic room or treatment center, time the provider entered the room, and time the patient left the room. These data were compared to the appointment and arrival times recorded by the secretary. Data on drug preparation and barriers to being treated on time were obtained from pharmacy and nursing staff for patients who received medications. Twenty-one percent of patients arrived late to their appointments. Delays were observed waiting in line to register and in phlebotomy because of no/unclear orders. The average waiting room time was 17.8 minutes (range 1-153) and 19.6 minutes in the exam room before the provider entered (range 1-127). Wait times were calculated for individual providers (range 7 - 43.4; SD=8.1). Ten percent of patients had both clinic and treatment appointments on the same day; 72% of those patients arrived late to their second appointment. The most common causes of treatment delay from a nursing perspective were: multiple demands on nursing time, IV access problems, lab values pending, and no orders for treatment. The most common pharmacy delays were for lack of order or signature on order. The results of this project have important implications for practice change. Recommendations for improvement include: install self-service kiosks for registration; stress importance of arriving on time for appointments; and ensuring all provider orders are entered promptly and signed. Nursing assignments should allow for emergency/add- on patients; a delay in patients with same day visits; and equality in patient volume/complexity. The large standard deviation in wait times has implications for specific providers, including altering scheduling time for visits.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleASSESSING PATIENT FLOW IN AN AMBULATORY ONCOLOGY SETTINGen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Shannonen_US
dc.author.detailsShannon Phillips, MS RN AOCNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, Rochester, New York, USA, email: ShannonPhillips@urmc.rochester.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165094-
dc.description.abstractThe flow of patients through ambulatory areas is central to patient and staff satisfaction, as well as reimbursement issues related to room/chair turn around time. Patient flow involves a multidisciplinary group approach, with cooperation needed from nurses, providers, clinical technicians, secretarial staff, and patients. The purpose of this project was to evaluate patient flow and quantify wait times in an outpatient cancer clinic and treatment center in Western New York. Data were collected on 442 patient visits during 35 business days. A student unobtrusively recorded the time the patient was taken into the clinic room or treatment center, time the provider entered the room, and time the patient left the room. These data were compared to the appointment and arrival times recorded by the secretary. Data on drug preparation and barriers to being treated on time were obtained from pharmacy and nursing staff for patients who received medications. Twenty-one percent of patients arrived late to their appointments. Delays were observed waiting in line to register and in phlebotomy because of no/unclear orders. The average waiting room time was 17.8 minutes (range 1-153) and 19.6 minutes in the exam room before the provider entered (range 1-127). Wait times were calculated for individual providers (range 7 - 43.4; SD=8.1). Ten percent of patients had both clinic and treatment appointments on the same day; 72% of those patients arrived late to their second appointment. The most common causes of treatment delay from a nursing perspective were: multiple demands on nursing time, IV access problems, lab values pending, and no orders for treatment. The most common pharmacy delays were for lack of order or signature on order. The results of this project have important implications for practice change. Recommendations for improvement include: install self-service kiosks for registration; stress importance of arriving on time for appointments; and ensuring all provider orders are entered promptly and signed. Nursing assignments should allow for emergency/add- on patients; a delay in patients with same day visits; and equality in patient volume/complexity. The large standard deviation in wait times has implications for specific providers, including altering scheduling time for visits.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:25Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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