2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165100
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE EXPERIENCE OF HOPE IN WOMEN WITH ADVANCED OVARIAN CANCER
Author(s):
Reb, Anne
Author Details:
Anne Reb, RN PhD NP, Research Nurse Manager, U.S Military Cancer Institute/Henry Jackson Foundation, Washington, DC, USA, email: areb@comcast.net
Abstract:
Women with advanced ovarian cancer (OVCA) experience significant losses and quality of life concerns upon realizing that they have a life-threatening illness. Maintaining hope may be a difficult challenge given the ongoing uncertainty and fears of cancer recurrence. Greater focus is needed on the psychosocial impact of this illness to identify nursing interventions to facilitate hope in this population. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of hope in women with advanced OVCA. Modified grounded theory methodology with interview approach guided this research. The conceptual orientation was based on symbolic interactionism and constructivist paradigms, which seek to discover the participantsÆ meaning that arises through social interactions. Purposive sampling was employed to collect data on 20 women with advanced OVCA who had not experienced a recurrence. A Personal Data Form (PDF) and focused interview guide supported data collection. The PDF addressed demographic and illness information; the interview guide included open-ended questions about hope. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative process including theoretical coding and memoing. ôFacing the death threatö emerged as the womenÆs main concern; the core variable in dealing with this concern was ôtransforming the death sentence.ö Three distinct phases emerged: (a) shock: reverberating from the impact, (b) aftershock: grasping reality and (c) rebuilding: living the new paradigm. Hope, provider communication, and spirituality influenced womenÆs ability to move through the phases. Four dimensions of the core variable were identified in relationship to two key variables, perceived support and control. Women with low perceived support and control aligned with the dimension ôtrapped in the illness,ö and had difficulty moving through the phases. Women with high support and control seemed most hopeful and able to face the death threat. Focusing on attainable goals and finding meaning in the experience enhanced perceived sense of control. This study suggests a need for improved provider communication strategies and screening measures assessing distress and symptoms. Phase-specific interventions are needed to target concerns at critical transition points during the illness. Future research should evaluate creative interventions including group support and complementary therapy approaches to enhance perceived support, control, and hope in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: ONS Foundation, ONCC Research Grant.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE EXPERIENCE OF HOPE IN WOMEN WITH ADVANCED OVARIAN CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReb, Anneen_US
dc.author.detailsAnne Reb, RN PhD NP, Research Nurse Manager, U.S Military Cancer Institute/Henry Jackson Foundation, Washington, DC, USA, email: areb@comcast.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165100-
dc.description.abstractWomen with advanced ovarian cancer (OVCA) experience significant losses and quality of life concerns upon realizing that they have a life-threatening illness. Maintaining hope may be a difficult challenge given the ongoing uncertainty and fears of cancer recurrence. Greater focus is needed on the psychosocial impact of this illness to identify nursing interventions to facilitate hope in this population. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of hope in women with advanced OVCA. Modified grounded theory methodology with interview approach guided this research. The conceptual orientation was based on symbolic interactionism and constructivist paradigms, which seek to discover the participantsÆ meaning that arises through social interactions. Purposive sampling was employed to collect data on 20 women with advanced OVCA who had not experienced a recurrence. A Personal Data Form (PDF) and focused interview guide supported data collection. The PDF addressed demographic and illness information; the interview guide included open-ended questions about hope. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative process including theoretical coding and memoing. ôFacing the death threatö emerged as the womenÆs main concern; the core variable in dealing with this concern was ôtransforming the death sentence.ö Three distinct phases emerged: (a) shock: reverberating from the impact, (b) aftershock: grasping reality and (c) rebuilding: living the new paradigm. Hope, provider communication, and spirituality influenced womenÆs ability to move through the phases. Four dimensions of the core variable were identified in relationship to two key variables, perceived support and control. Women with low perceived support and control aligned with the dimension ôtrapped in the illness,ö and had difficulty moving through the phases. Women with high support and control seemed most hopeful and able to face the death threat. Focusing on attainable goals and finding meaning in the experience enhanced perceived sense of control. This study suggests a need for improved provider communication strategies and screening measures assessing distress and symptoms. Phase-specific interventions are needed to target concerns at critical transition points during the illness. Future research should evaluate creative interventions including group support and complementary therapy approaches to enhance perceived support, control, and hope in this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:31Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: ONS Foundation, ONCC Research Grant.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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