2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165101
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
FIGHTING THE FLU: A VACCINATION PROGRAM FOR HEALTHCARE WORKERS
Author(s):
Reedy, Anita
Author Details:
Anita Reedy, RN MSN OCN, Nurse Manager, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: reedyan@jhmi.edu
Abstract:
Healthcare workers can transmit influenza to patients even when they are asymptomatic. The CDC recommends vaccination of healthcare workers as a standard of care. Healthcare workers who receive flu vaccination are reported at only 35% - 45%. This number is not adequate to prevent transmission of flu. Barriers to flu vaccination include concern that the vaccine will be ineffective, fear of developing flu from the vaccine and fear of needles. This NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center piloted a program where 100% of the staff on each unit would either get the vaccine or actively decline it. It was believed that by actively approaching each individual, vaccinations would increase by greater than 45%. By increasing the numbers vaccinated, the risk of spreading influenza to immunocompromised patients would decrease. The Nurse Manager on each unit identified a "champion", a nurse who would promote influenza vaccination. The name of each staff member was entered onto an Excel spreadsheet and posted on the unit. Each staff member was approached by the champion, Clinical Nurse Specialist or Nurse Manager to assure they either received the vaccine or actively declined it, giving their reasons for declination. This assured that no staff member "fell through the cracks" and was missed by passive non participation. Data was collated and presented to staff, the cancer centerÆs administration and HospitalÆs Epidemiology and Infection Control Committee (HEIC). 100% of the nursing staff on each unit was contacted to either receive or decline the vaccine. Rates for each of the 4 inpatient units were 73%, 84%, 72%, and 85% and 60% for the outpatient unit. RNs were more likely to be vaccinated than support staff. 106 other staff, including doctors, respiratory and physical/occupational therapists and social workers was also vaccinated. These vaccination numbers are significantly higher than those reported in the literature. Influenza vaccination rates can be affected by programs where each staff member is approached for vaccination or declination. Reasons for declination can be used to educate staff with the goal of increasing future vaccination rates. This can result in the decrease of transmission of influenza to patients from infected healthcare workers.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFIGHTING THE FLU: A VACCINATION PROGRAM FOR HEALTHCARE WORKERSen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReedy, Anitaen_US
dc.author.detailsAnita Reedy, RN MSN OCN, Nurse Manager, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: reedyan@jhmi.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165101-
dc.description.abstractHealthcare workers can transmit influenza to patients even when they are asymptomatic. The CDC recommends vaccination of healthcare workers as a standard of care. Healthcare workers who receive flu vaccination are reported at only 35% - 45%. This number is not adequate to prevent transmission of flu. Barriers to flu vaccination include concern that the vaccine will be ineffective, fear of developing flu from the vaccine and fear of needles. This NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center piloted a program where 100% of the staff on each unit would either get the vaccine or actively decline it. It was believed that by actively approaching each individual, vaccinations would increase by greater than 45%. By increasing the numbers vaccinated, the risk of spreading influenza to immunocompromised patients would decrease. The Nurse Manager on each unit identified a "champion", a nurse who would promote influenza vaccination. The name of each staff member was entered onto an Excel spreadsheet and posted on the unit. Each staff member was approached by the champion, Clinical Nurse Specialist or Nurse Manager to assure they either received the vaccine or actively declined it, giving their reasons for declination. This assured that no staff member "fell through the cracks" and was missed by passive non participation. Data was collated and presented to staff, the cancer centerÆs administration and HospitalÆs Epidemiology and Infection Control Committee (HEIC). 100% of the nursing staff on each unit was contacted to either receive or decline the vaccine. Rates for each of the 4 inpatient units were 73%, 84%, 72%, and 85% and 60% for the outpatient unit. RNs were more likely to be vaccinated than support staff. 106 other staff, including doctors, respiratory and physical/occupational therapists and social workers was also vaccinated. These vaccination numbers are significantly higher than those reported in the literature. Influenza vaccination rates can be affected by programs where each staff member is approached for vaccination or declination. Reasons for declination can be used to educate staff with the goal of increasing future vaccination rates. This can result in the decrease of transmission of influenza to patients from infected healthcare workers.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:33Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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