BARRIERS TO USING THE NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK (NCCN) DISTRESS MANAGEMENT TOOL: DOES IT CAUSE MORE STRESS?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165105
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
BARRIERS TO USING THE NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK (NCCN) DISTRESS MANAGEMENT TOOL: DOES IT CAUSE MORE STRESS?
Author(s):
Robbins, Mary Ann
Author Details:
Mary Ann Robbins, RN BSN OCN, Nurse Manager of the Department of Radiation, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: robbins@radonc.duke.edu
Abstract:
The NCCN Distress Tool defines distress as an unpleasant experience of emotional, psychological, social or spiritual nature that interferes with the ability to cope with your treatment. Cancer patients experience some type of distress during their cancer journey. Physical symptoms are easier to diagnosis and manage for most health care providers. Therefore, psychosocial issues often go unaddressed and unresolved. The NCCN Distress Tool has been shown to be an effective tool for identifying non-physical issues. Nurses who are uncomfortable with addressing non-physical issues may choose not to use the tool, therefore providing inconsistent care. The purpose of this project is to understand the barriers to using the NCCN Distress Tool during weeks 1 and 5 of radiation and to reinforce use of the assessment tool during radiation therapy. A pilot project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using the NCCN tool. Upon completion of the pilot, the tool was to be used, during weeks 1 and 5 of treatment. Chart audits indicated that the tool was only completed 75% of the time. A questionnaire was developed and given to the nursing staff to complete. Feedback regarding use of the tool suggested that some nurses felt uncomfortable with approaching patients and discussing their concerns and that physicians were not always supportive of the time the patient needed to complete the tool. Based on these identified barriers, the Clinical Nurse Specialist and the Director of the Cancer Patient Support Program conducted educational sessions with the staff. Ongoing chart audits continue to show improvement in completion rates of the tool. The nursing staff is more comfortable with using the tool, discussing issues with the patient and making appropriate referrals. Educational sessions addressing psychosocial, emotional and spiritual needs may need to be addressed periodically so nurses are comfortable addressing these concerns. The tool provides opportunities for open communication between nurses and patients to discuss concerns based upon the patientÆs perception. Ongoing evaluation and discussion regarding use of the tool, referral processes, and comfort level are critical to the success.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBARRIERS TO USING THE NATIONAL COMPREHENSIVE CANCER NETWORK (NCCN) DISTRESS MANAGEMENT TOOL: DOES IT CAUSE MORE STRESS?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Mary Annen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Ann Robbins, RN BSN OCN, Nurse Manager of the Department of Radiation, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: robbins@radonc.duke.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165105-
dc.description.abstractThe NCCN Distress Tool defines distress as an unpleasant experience of emotional, psychological, social or spiritual nature that interferes with the ability to cope with your treatment. Cancer patients experience some type of distress during their cancer journey. Physical symptoms are easier to diagnosis and manage for most health care providers. Therefore, psychosocial issues often go unaddressed and unresolved. The NCCN Distress Tool has been shown to be an effective tool for identifying non-physical issues. Nurses who are uncomfortable with addressing non-physical issues may choose not to use the tool, therefore providing inconsistent care. The purpose of this project is to understand the barriers to using the NCCN Distress Tool during weeks 1 and 5 of radiation and to reinforce use of the assessment tool during radiation therapy. A pilot project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using the NCCN tool. Upon completion of the pilot, the tool was to be used, during weeks 1 and 5 of treatment. Chart audits indicated that the tool was only completed 75% of the time. A questionnaire was developed and given to the nursing staff to complete. Feedback regarding use of the tool suggested that some nurses felt uncomfortable with approaching patients and discussing their concerns and that physicians were not always supportive of the time the patient needed to complete the tool. Based on these identified barriers, the Clinical Nurse Specialist and the Director of the Cancer Patient Support Program conducted educational sessions with the staff. Ongoing chart audits continue to show improvement in completion rates of the tool. The nursing staff is more comfortable with using the tool, discussing issues with the patient and making appropriate referrals. Educational sessions addressing psychosocial, emotional and spiritual needs may need to be addressed periodically so nurses are comfortable addressing these concerns. The tool provides opportunities for open communication between nurses and patients to discuss concerns based upon the patientÆs perception. Ongoing evaluation and discussion regarding use of the tool, referral processes, and comfort level are critical to the success.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:37Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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