HOW MUCH BLOOD IS ENOUGH? AN EVIDENCE BASED STUDY ON THE MINIMUM BLOOD VOLUME REQUIRED FOR LABORATORY TESTS.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165106
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HOW MUCH BLOOD IS ENOUGH? AN EVIDENCE BASED STUDY ON THE MINIMUM BLOOD VOLUME REQUIRED FOR LABORATORY TESTS.
Author(s):
Rodriguez, Wanda; McCarty,Doreen; Donnell, AnnMarie; Kane, Joyce; Nolan, Stephanie; Carlese, Christina
Author Details:
Wanda Rodriguez, RN MA CCRN, Clinical Nurse Specialist-PACU, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: rodriguw@mskcc.org; Doreen McCarty, BSN, RN, CPAN; AnnMarie O'Donnell, RN; Joyce Kane, MSN, RN, CCRN; Stephanie Nolan, BS, RN; Cristina Carlese, MA, RN, CCRN
Abstract:
Frequent blood sampling for laboratory testing can be an unnecessary source of blood loss in the critically ill oncology patient. The increased number of analytes measured combined with increased frequency in testing and easier collection with arterial and venous catheters can directly lead to iatrogenic anemia. As critical care oncology nurses we recognized our role in performing the majority of these tests. We wanted to seek preventive strategies to minimize excessive blood loss and decrease the patientÆs risk for anemia. An evidence based review of the literature was conducted to determine the minimum blood volume required to run selected lab tests. A total of 26 articles from CINAHL, PubMed, MEDLINE, Google, The Cochrane Library, and Evidence Matters were reviewed. There were a limited number of meta-analysis, randomized experimental design, quasi-experimental and non-experimental studies related to blood conserving mechanisms. Expert opinions and guidelines were evaluated. Committee members from the PACU and ICU ranked the evidence based on the Stetler Model. The current evidence supports using smaller volume vacuum collection tubes for specified laboratory tests such as troponin and basic metabolic panel. The committee concluded that blood volume needed to perform chemistry tests in our departments could be reduced by half. In PACU and ICU this lead to the use of the smaller plastic 4ml tubes versus the larger 8ml glass tubes. In addition, the smaller tubes are less likely to cause hemolysis, due to less vacuum inside the tube. Current limitations to applying the evidence from this review consist of restricting the change to critical care areas. This is primarily due to the excessive number of ôadd onö tests required on the inpatient units. However, this is undergoing further discussion and exploration. Moving forward we will track blood product usage, specifically RBC transfusions, in an attempt to determine the success of this new practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHOW MUCH BLOOD IS ENOUGH? AN EVIDENCE BASED STUDY ON THE MINIMUM BLOOD VOLUME REQUIRED FOR LABORATORY TESTS.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Wandaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcCarty,Doreenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDonnell, AnnMarieen_US
dc.contributor.authorKane, Joyceen_US
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Stephanieen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarlese, Christinaen_US
dc.author.detailsWanda Rodriguez, RN MA CCRN, Clinical Nurse Specialist-PACU, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: rodriguw@mskcc.org; Doreen McCarty, BSN, RN, CPAN; AnnMarie O'Donnell, RN; Joyce Kane, MSN, RN, CCRN; Stephanie Nolan, BS, RN; Cristina Carlese, MA, RN, CCRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165106-
dc.description.abstractFrequent blood sampling for laboratory testing can be an unnecessary source of blood loss in the critically ill oncology patient. The increased number of analytes measured combined with increased frequency in testing and easier collection with arterial and venous catheters can directly lead to iatrogenic anemia. As critical care oncology nurses we recognized our role in performing the majority of these tests. We wanted to seek preventive strategies to minimize excessive blood loss and decrease the patientÆs risk for anemia. An evidence based review of the literature was conducted to determine the minimum blood volume required to run selected lab tests. A total of 26 articles from CINAHL, PubMed, MEDLINE, Google, The Cochrane Library, and Evidence Matters were reviewed. There were a limited number of meta-analysis, randomized experimental design, quasi-experimental and non-experimental studies related to blood conserving mechanisms. Expert opinions and guidelines were evaluated. Committee members from the PACU and ICU ranked the evidence based on the Stetler Model. The current evidence supports using smaller volume vacuum collection tubes for specified laboratory tests such as troponin and basic metabolic panel. The committee concluded that blood volume needed to perform chemistry tests in our departments could be reduced by half. In PACU and ICU this lead to the use of the smaller plastic 4ml tubes versus the larger 8ml glass tubes. In addition, the smaller tubes are less likely to cause hemolysis, due to less vacuum inside the tube. Current limitations to applying the evidence from this review consist of restricting the change to critical care areas. This is primarily due to the excessive number of ôadd onö tests required on the inpatient units. However, this is undergoing further discussion and exploration. Moving forward we will track blood product usage, specifically RBC transfusions, in an attempt to determine the success of this new practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:38Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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