THE ONCOLOGY SERVICE LINE'S USE OF SIX SIGMA IN THE COWDERY PATIENT CARE CENTER: CREATING STANDARDIZED PROCESSES TO IMPROVE PATIENT FLOW, IMPROVING STAFF AND PATIENT SATISFACTION.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165107
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THE ONCOLOGY SERVICE LINE'S USE OF SIX SIGMA IN THE COWDERY PATIENT CARE CENTER: CREATING STANDARDIZED PROCESSES TO IMPROVE PATIENT FLOW, IMPROVING STAFF AND PATIENT SATISFACTION.
Author(s):
Roesler, Karen; Dydyk, Deb
Author Details:
Karen Roesler, RN, Lead Nurse, The Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: kroesler74@yahoo.com; Deb Dydyk, BS, MA, BSN, RN, C
Abstract:
The Cowdery Patient Care Center (CPCC) is an outpatient treatment center with approximately 110 patient visits daily. The majority (85%) are Oncology/Bone Marrow Transplant patients with appointments ranging from 30 minutes to 10 hours. In addition to scheduled patients, the CPCC accommodates unscheduled, urgent care visits for problems such as nausea/vomiting, pain, or fever. Staff struggled with patient flow and timeliness of treatments; patients/ families expressed concern with delays. The Cancer Service Line initiated a Patient Flow Project using the defined, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC) process of Six Sigma to improve patient flow and reduce delays. The purpose was to identify causes of delays, identify solutions, and standardize work practices to eliminate delays while continuing to provide safe, competent care, and improve satisfaction. Process experts including RNÆs, techs, clerks, and managers were chosen to participate on this project. The team used the DMAIC process to identify factors contributing to patient flow problems and issues contributing to delays in treatment start times. (1) Data were collected to validate if the factors identified were supported. (2) The team identified improvements which could be made, (3) implemented improvements, (4) collected further data, and if the change was successful, (5) developed a control plan to ensure it would be sustainable. Surveys had indicated patients were willing to wait an average of 22 minutes for treatments to start. When the project started in 2004, 29% of the treatments started within 22 minutes; in 2006, after implementing the changes, this increased to 78%. Changes implemented included adjusting the scheduling template and process, separating out the short appointments, changing the check in process, and altering the role of the charge RN to primarily monitor flow and triage. Data collection continues on a monthly basis. Nursing staff are directly involved in patient care and play a pivotal role in patient outcomes and care efficiency. Providing staff with tools and resources to improve care efficiency and involving them with identification of solutions facilitates improved staff and patient satisfaction. Nurses will be able to use the information in this presentation to guide similar improvement projects in their clinical settings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHE ONCOLOGY SERVICE LINE'S USE OF SIX SIGMA IN THE COWDERY PATIENT CARE CENTER: CREATING STANDARDIZED PROCESSES TO IMPROVE PATIENT FLOW, IMPROVING STAFF AND PATIENT SATISFACTION.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoesler, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDydyk, Deben_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Roesler, RN, Lead Nurse, The Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: kroesler74@yahoo.com; Deb Dydyk, BS, MA, BSN, RN, Cen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165107-
dc.description.abstractThe Cowdery Patient Care Center (CPCC) is an outpatient treatment center with approximately 110 patient visits daily. The majority (85%) are Oncology/Bone Marrow Transplant patients with appointments ranging from 30 minutes to 10 hours. In addition to scheduled patients, the CPCC accommodates unscheduled, urgent care visits for problems such as nausea/vomiting, pain, or fever. Staff struggled with patient flow and timeliness of treatments; patients/ families expressed concern with delays. The Cancer Service Line initiated a Patient Flow Project using the defined, measure, analyze, improve, and control (DMAIC) process of Six Sigma to improve patient flow and reduce delays. The purpose was to identify causes of delays, identify solutions, and standardize work practices to eliminate delays while continuing to provide safe, competent care, and improve satisfaction. Process experts including RNÆs, techs, clerks, and managers were chosen to participate on this project. The team used the DMAIC process to identify factors contributing to patient flow problems and issues contributing to delays in treatment start times. (1) Data were collected to validate if the factors identified were supported. (2) The team identified improvements which could be made, (3) implemented improvements, (4) collected further data, and if the change was successful, (5) developed a control plan to ensure it would be sustainable. Surveys had indicated patients were willing to wait an average of 22 minutes for treatments to start. When the project started in 2004, 29% of the treatments started within 22 minutes; in 2006, after implementing the changes, this increased to 78%. Changes implemented included adjusting the scheduling template and process, separating out the short appointments, changing the check in process, and altering the role of the charge RN to primarily monitor flow and triage. Data collection continues on a monthly basis. Nursing staff are directly involved in patient care and play a pivotal role in patient outcomes and care efficiency. Providing staff with tools and resources to improve care efficiency and involving them with identification of solutions facilitates improved staff and patient satisfaction. Nurses will be able to use the information in this presentation to guide similar improvement projects in their clinical settings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:39Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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