INFECTION CONTROL AND PREVENTION IN THE ONCOLOGY POPULATION: DEVELOPING AN INFECTION CONTROL RESOURCE NURSE PROGRAM

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165111
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
INFECTION CONTROL AND PREVENTION IN THE ONCOLOGY POPULATION: DEVELOPING AN INFECTION CONTROL RESOURCE NURSE PROGRAM
Author(s):
Roman, Lisa; Mulderrig, Laura
Author Details:
Lisa Roman, MSN RN OCN, Clinical Manager, Lippincott Family Hospice, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: LRoman@fccc.edu; Laura Mulderrig, BSN, RN, OCN
Abstract:
Oncology patients become immune-compromised due to one or more flaws in bodily integrity. Some of these flaws include defects in skin and mucous membranes caused by medical treatment (i.e. surgery, radiation, chemotherapy), trauma, smoking, invasive catheters, and/or poor hygiene. Defects may also be caused by obstructive conditions (tumors, calcifications), abnormal number of granulocytes, abnormal cell-mediated immunity, and sedation or central nervous system dysfunction. Opportunistic infections may arise as a result. A number of measures should be routinely implemented to prevent infections. The oncology patient can strengthen defenses by practicing good dental care, not smoking, following treatment recommendations, performing hand hygiene, keeping immunizations up-to-date, maintaining good nutrition, engaging in physical conditioning, and receiving psychosocial support. Oncology nurses can help protect the immune-compromised patient by practicing effective hand hygiene, cleansing the patient's skin antiseptically whenever it must be breached, strictly following transmission-based isolation guidelines, and restricting visitors with communicable diseases. Based on assessment of a need to incorporate current infection control and prevention standards for use by the bedside practitioner, an instructional program to develop Infection Control Resource Nurse (ICRNs) leaders was proposed, planned, and implemented at this NCI-designated cancer center. Utilizing evidence-based guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Association of Professionals in Infection Control & Epidemiology (APIC), and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), an educational curriculum was developed by an infection control practitioner who is also an oncology- certified registered nurse for oncology nurses with an interest in infection control and prevention. The curriculum objectives included describing the interaction between agent, host, and environment, as well as modes of transmission, which promote the chain of infection; reviewing standard and transmission- based precautions; reviewing types of opportunistic infections; discussing antimicrobial therapy and emerging resistance; exploring the purpose and benefits of microbiology culture surveillance; promoting patient safety initiatives; and listing patient/family education strategies. Nurses from every inpatient and outpatient area of the center participated in the inaugural core training day sessions. With specialized training and continuing educational opportunities, ICRNs will improve identification of patients at risk for infection, improve quality of care, and reduce or prevent the incidence of infections.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleINFECTION CONTROL AND PREVENTION IN THE ONCOLOGY POPULATION: DEVELOPING AN INFECTION CONTROL RESOURCE NURSE PROGRAMen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoman, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMulderrig, Lauraen_US
dc.author.detailsLisa Roman, MSN RN OCN, Clinical Manager, Lippincott Family Hospice, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: LRoman@fccc.edu; Laura Mulderrig, BSN, RN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165111-
dc.description.abstractOncology patients become immune-compromised due to one or more flaws in bodily integrity. Some of these flaws include defects in skin and mucous membranes caused by medical treatment (i.e. surgery, radiation, chemotherapy), trauma, smoking, invasive catheters, and/or poor hygiene. Defects may also be caused by obstructive conditions (tumors, calcifications), abnormal number of granulocytes, abnormal cell-mediated immunity, and sedation or central nervous system dysfunction. Opportunistic infections may arise as a result. A number of measures should be routinely implemented to prevent infections. The oncology patient can strengthen defenses by practicing good dental care, not smoking, following treatment recommendations, performing hand hygiene, keeping immunizations up-to-date, maintaining good nutrition, engaging in physical conditioning, and receiving psychosocial support. Oncology nurses can help protect the immune-compromised patient by practicing effective hand hygiene, cleansing the patient's skin antiseptically whenever it must be breached, strictly following transmission-based isolation guidelines, and restricting visitors with communicable diseases. Based on assessment of a need to incorporate current infection control and prevention standards for use by the bedside practitioner, an instructional program to develop Infection Control Resource Nurse (ICRNs) leaders was proposed, planned, and implemented at this NCI-designated cancer center. Utilizing evidence-based guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Association of Professionals in Infection Control & Epidemiology (APIC), and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), an educational curriculum was developed by an infection control practitioner who is also an oncology- certified registered nurse for oncology nurses with an interest in infection control and prevention. The curriculum objectives included describing the interaction between agent, host, and environment, as well as modes of transmission, which promote the chain of infection; reviewing standard and transmission- based precautions; reviewing types of opportunistic infections; discussing antimicrobial therapy and emerging resistance; exploring the purpose and benefits of microbiology culture surveillance; promoting patient safety initiatives; and listing patient/family education strategies. Nurses from every inpatient and outpatient area of the center participated in the inaugural core training day sessions. With specialized training and continuing educational opportunities, ICRNs will improve identification of patients at risk for infection, improve quality of care, and reduce or prevent the incidence of infections.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:43Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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