PATIENT TREATMENT ORIENTATION 101: EMPOWERING PATIENTS TO BECOME ACTIVE PARTICIPANTS OF THEIR HEALTHCARE TEAM

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165116
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PATIENT TREATMENT ORIENTATION 101: EMPOWERING PATIENTS TO BECOME ACTIVE PARTICIPANTS OF THEIR HEALTHCARE TEAM
Author(s):
Scaramuzzo, Leah
Author Details:
Leah Scaramuzzo, MSN, RN, C, AOCN, Oncology Education Specialist, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, email: mrazla@umdnj.edu
Abstract:
Several mandated standards and guidelines indicate nurses have a legal, moral, and ethical responsibility for patient education. Oncology nurses at an outpatient NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center provided one-on-one teaching during patientsÆ initial cancer treatments and found they were often anxious and overwhelmed by the amount and complexity of information; this decreased their ability to comprehend and retain information essential to self-care management. In addition, nurses were challenged to integrate in-depth teaching into their busy schedules and numerous patients underutilized support resources. The purpose in initiating a treatment orientation program was to provide patients with a general understanding of cancer treatments and specific information about the Center and available resources using principles of adult teaching-learning. Evidence demonstrates that knowledge decreases distress, and therefore facilitates coping and adaptation to a cancer diagnosis thus enabling patients to become active participants in their healthcare, a goal of JCAHOÆs ôSpeak Upö program. Effective patient education can increase compliance with treatment regimens, facilitate recognition of adverse events, improve clinical outcomes, and decrease healthcare expenses. Program content was developed through literature reviews, industry benchmarking, sessions with interdisciplinary experts, and focus groups of patients undergoing treatment. Patients/families are now offered a 90-minute class where they learn about the Center, roles of their healthcare team, evidence-based self-care strategies, and support resources. The program concludes with a tour of the treatment facility, Q&A, and networking opportunities with others newly facing treatment. 219 written evaluations revealed participants felt less anxious, more informed, and better prepared. Staff feedback has been overwhelmingly positive, as the program has improved effectiveness and efficiency of the education process. Reduced variability in teaching content and increased compliance with documentation of patient education has been found since the programÆs inception. Nursing feedback; patients now ask more questions, utilize supportive services, and participate in healthcare decisions. Oncology nurses are in a key position to develop and implement this ôbest-educationö didactic template as the nursing shortage reduces time available for patient education. The orientation program paradigm is currently being adapted for new patients receiving care in the surgical and radiation oncology sections and various multi- media alternatives are being explored.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePATIENT TREATMENT ORIENTATION 101: EMPOWERING PATIENTS TO BECOME ACTIVE PARTICIPANTS OF THEIR HEALTHCARE TEAMen_GB
dc.contributor.authorScaramuzzo, Leahen_US
dc.author.detailsLeah Scaramuzzo, MSN, RN, C, AOCN, Oncology Education Specialist, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, email: mrazla@umdnj.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165116-
dc.description.abstractSeveral mandated standards and guidelines indicate nurses have a legal, moral, and ethical responsibility for patient education. Oncology nurses at an outpatient NCI-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center provided one-on-one teaching during patientsÆ initial cancer treatments and found they were often anxious and overwhelmed by the amount and complexity of information; this decreased their ability to comprehend and retain information essential to self-care management. In addition, nurses were challenged to integrate in-depth teaching into their busy schedules and numerous patients underutilized support resources. The purpose in initiating a treatment orientation program was to provide patients with a general understanding of cancer treatments and specific information about the Center and available resources using principles of adult teaching-learning. Evidence demonstrates that knowledge decreases distress, and therefore facilitates coping and adaptation to a cancer diagnosis thus enabling patients to become active participants in their healthcare, a goal of JCAHOÆs ôSpeak Upö program. Effective patient education can increase compliance with treatment regimens, facilitate recognition of adverse events, improve clinical outcomes, and decrease healthcare expenses. Program content was developed through literature reviews, industry benchmarking, sessions with interdisciplinary experts, and focus groups of patients undergoing treatment. Patients/families are now offered a 90-minute class where they learn about the Center, roles of their healthcare team, evidence-based self-care strategies, and support resources. The program concludes with a tour of the treatment facility, Q&A, and networking opportunities with others newly facing treatment. 219 written evaluations revealed participants felt less anxious, more informed, and better prepared. Staff feedback has been overwhelmingly positive, as the program has improved effectiveness and efficiency of the education process. Reduced variability in teaching content and increased compliance with documentation of patient education has been found since the programÆs inception. Nursing feedback; patients now ask more questions, utilize supportive services, and participate in healthcare decisions. Oncology nurses are in a key position to develop and implement this ôbest-educationö didactic template as the nursing shortage reduces time available for patient education. The orientation program paradigm is currently being adapted for new patients receiving care in the surgical and radiation oncology sections and various multi- media alternatives are being explored.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:48Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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