DEVELOPING A CRANIOTOMY POST OPERATIVE DISCHARGE INSTRUCTION SHEET: A LESSON IN MULTIDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165123
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
DEVELOPING A CRANIOTOMY POST OPERATIVE DISCHARGE INSTRUCTION SHEET: A LESSON IN MULTIDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION
Author(s):
Sendlak, Deborah
Author Details:
Deborah Sendlak, RN, Staff Nurse, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: deborah.sendlak@roswellpark.org
Abstract:
A craniotomy is a frightening experience for both patients and family members. Despite multiple teaching moments regarding postoperative instructions, it is the activities of daily living that patientÆs voice concerns about prior to and after discharge. Patients are educated and evaluated by oncology nurses for their ability to provide self-care after discharge from the hospital, but still often express anxiety about what they will encounter at home. In our setting patients also received instructions from surgeons, nurse practitioners, respiratory therapists and physical therapists, but no one discharge document existed to provide a concise and integrated resource. Providing educational support in the hospital can be fragmented among disciplines so clear postoperative instructions for them to use at home is paramount for their well-being. A minimal amount of printed materials existed for patients being discharged following a craniotomy that focused on step-by-step essential information in one complete document. The purpose for developing this tool was to provide useful information that can be easily understood by both the patients and their caregivers. The development of this tool from inception to acceptance by all disciplines involved in the care of patients experiencing a craniotomy will be outlined along with samples of the actual tool developed. This tool can be replicated in other settings and for other types of surgical procedures. Our first step was to review the current educational process and the instructions provided to our patients for them to use at home. We identified that the information provided was often fragmented among the disciplines. Step by step essential information in a complete document was not available. It was quickly identified that we had an opportunity to improve how we prepare this special group of patients for self-care following surgery. This presentation will outline how the disciplines were involved in the development of a Craniotomy Post Op discharge instruction resource we provide to our patients and the evolution of the process improvement.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDEVELOPING A CRANIOTOMY POST OPERATIVE DISCHARGE INSTRUCTION SHEET: A LESSON IN MULTIDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATIONen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSendlak, Deborahen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Sendlak, RN, Staff Nurse, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: deborah.sendlak@roswellpark.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165123-
dc.description.abstractA craniotomy is a frightening experience for both patients and family members. Despite multiple teaching moments regarding postoperative instructions, it is the activities of daily living that patientÆs voice concerns about prior to and after discharge. Patients are educated and evaluated by oncology nurses for their ability to provide self-care after discharge from the hospital, but still often express anxiety about what they will encounter at home. In our setting patients also received instructions from surgeons, nurse practitioners, respiratory therapists and physical therapists, but no one discharge document existed to provide a concise and integrated resource. Providing educational support in the hospital can be fragmented among disciplines so clear postoperative instructions for them to use at home is paramount for their well-being. A minimal amount of printed materials existed for patients being discharged following a craniotomy that focused on step-by-step essential information in one complete document. The purpose for developing this tool was to provide useful information that can be easily understood by both the patients and their caregivers. The development of this tool from inception to acceptance by all disciplines involved in the care of patients experiencing a craniotomy will be outlined along with samples of the actual tool developed. This tool can be replicated in other settings and for other types of surgical procedures. Our first step was to review the current educational process and the instructions provided to our patients for them to use at home. We identified that the information provided was often fragmented among the disciplines. Step by step essential information in a complete document was not available. It was quickly identified that we had an opportunity to improve how we prepare this special group of patients for self-care following surgery. This presentation will outline how the disciplines were involved in the development of a Craniotomy Post Op discharge instruction resource we provide to our patients and the evolution of the process improvement.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:12:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:12:56Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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