9.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165128
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IMPROVING SKIN CARE OF THE PEDIATRIC BLOOD AND MARROW TRANSPLANT PATIENT
Author(s):
Smith, Michelle; Frey, Michelle; Kurtzberg, Joanne
Author Details:
Michelle Smith, RN BSN, Clinical Nurse IV, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: smith318@mc.duke.edu; Michelle Frey, RN, MS, AOCN; Joanne Kurtzberg, MD
Abstract:
Infection remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the immune-suppressed patient. The risk of infection is dramatically increased when the bodyÆs basic defenses are altered and lack normal infection fighting capabilities. The skin is the largest organ of the body and the most frequently affected. Patients undergoing chemotherapy, radiation, and/or marrow ablation (bone marrow/ stem cell transplantation) are at even greater risk for life threatening infection as a result of skin breakdown. Additional insults such as graft-versus-host disease, engraftment, respiratory and systemic infections, increased need for oxygen and prolonged immobility place the patient at even greater risk. The purpose of this poster is to describe the Duke Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant program Skin Care Initiative. This program was developed in 2001 in an attempt to reduce infection and morbidity associated with skin breakdown. The goals of this program were to develop and implement strategies to ensure early detection of patients at risk for skin breakdown and to standardize the plan of care. Each unit within the hospital designates a ôunit-basedö skin care champion who is responsible for the oversight of patients and the education of staff. The program has detailed guidelines and procedures for the prevention of skin breakdown and strategies for early intervention and treatment. The pain champion is responsible for monthly audits of all patients. The audits evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions as well as the documentation of skin integrity. The data is reviewed by unit and Hospital leadership and is reported and trended via the National Database of Nursing Indictators (NDNQI). By performing thorough skin assessments on all pediatric bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients, we can decrease the incidence of skin breakdown and lessen the severity of patientsÆ suffering, risk for infections, length of stay and ultimately, mortality.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIMPROVING SKIN CARE OF THE PEDIATRIC BLOOD AND MARROW TRANSPLANT PATIENTen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorFrey, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorKurtzberg, Joanneen_US
dc.author.detailsMichelle Smith, RN BSN, Clinical Nurse IV, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: smith318@mc.duke.edu; Michelle Frey, RN, MS, AOCN; Joanne Kurtzberg, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165128-
dc.description.abstractInfection remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the immune-suppressed patient. The risk of infection is dramatically increased when the bodyÆs basic defenses are altered and lack normal infection fighting capabilities. The skin is the largest organ of the body and the most frequently affected. Patients undergoing chemotherapy, radiation, and/or marrow ablation (bone marrow/ stem cell transplantation) are at even greater risk for life threatening infection as a result of skin breakdown. Additional insults such as graft-versus-host disease, engraftment, respiratory and systemic infections, increased need for oxygen and prolonged immobility place the patient at even greater risk. The purpose of this poster is to describe the Duke Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant program Skin Care Initiative. This program was developed in 2001 in an attempt to reduce infection and morbidity associated with skin breakdown. The goals of this program were to develop and implement strategies to ensure early detection of patients at risk for skin breakdown and to standardize the plan of care. Each unit within the hospital designates a ôunit-basedö skin care champion who is responsible for the oversight of patients and the education of staff. The program has detailed guidelines and procedures for the prevention of skin breakdown and strategies for early intervention and treatment. The pain champion is responsible for monthly audits of all patients. The audits evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions as well as the documentation of skin integrity. The data is reviewed by unit and Hospital leadership and is reported and trended via the National Database of Nursing Indictators (NDNQI). By performing thorough skin assessments on all pediatric bone marrow and stem cell transplant patients, we can decrease the incidence of skin breakdown and lessen the severity of patientsÆ suffering, risk for infections, length of stay and ultimately, mortality.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:01Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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