2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165130
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
BABY BOOMERS AND GENERATION X: NURSING EDUCATION BEYOND THE COMPUTER
Author(s):
Smith, Regina; Hunter, Betty
Author Details:
Regina Smith, RN BSN, OCN, Nursing Instructor, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: resmith@mdanderson.org; Betty Hunter, RN, MA, BSN, OCN
Abstract:
The emerging nursing workforce has different values, learning styles, and anticipated outcomes. Technology has moved us to mandatory coexistence. This will challenge current teaching strategies and their effectiveness. Designated curriculum committees are being utilized to formally integrate lectures and computer based training. Recent educational studies have examined the learning styles of the Baby Boomer versus Generation X age groups within clinical nursing. During nursing orientation all new nurses are trained through didactic lectures and computer based training. Baby Boomers have a love- hate relationship with technology and generally do what they are told. Generation X grew up with computers and view technology as a time saving tool. The aim is to compare the effectiveness of re-training staff with limited computer skills and staff accustomed to didactic lectures. This process was evaluated by computer on an ongoing basis. During a six month evaluation, learning styles between the two generations, effective teaching and learning strategies were introduced through technology based education. Feedback was received from the new orienteer through an online survey tool. The computer provided a step by step procedure and self paced program. Lecture styles are primarily power point and individual speakers. This allows for personal interactionù many need more than someone reading a particular slide presentation. To measure the overall effectiveness of the program, we offered online evaluations in order to provide feedback. Evaluation the responses based on different generation, learning styles and prior computer training. Additional training and ongoing teaching strategies will require additional staff with technology backgrounds. In conclusion we noted a need to continue a combination of the two lecture styles, while further evaluation of generational difference will need to be evaluated. This development and effectiveness of teaching alone does not integrated computer technology as the primary teaching source. Further advancement in technology will cause curriculums to increase collaboration, critical thinking and problem solving through the use of the computer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBABY BOOMERS AND GENERATION X: NURSING EDUCATION BEYOND THE COMPUTERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Reginaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Bettyen_US
dc.author.detailsRegina Smith, RN BSN, OCN, Nursing Instructor, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: resmith@mdanderson.org; Betty Hunter, RN, MA, BSN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165130-
dc.description.abstractThe emerging nursing workforce has different values, learning styles, and anticipated outcomes. Technology has moved us to mandatory coexistence. This will challenge current teaching strategies and their effectiveness. Designated curriculum committees are being utilized to formally integrate lectures and computer based training. Recent educational studies have examined the learning styles of the Baby Boomer versus Generation X age groups within clinical nursing. During nursing orientation all new nurses are trained through didactic lectures and computer based training. Baby Boomers have a love- hate relationship with technology and generally do what they are told. Generation X grew up with computers and view technology as a time saving tool. The aim is to compare the effectiveness of re-training staff with limited computer skills and staff accustomed to didactic lectures. This process was evaluated by computer on an ongoing basis. During a six month evaluation, learning styles between the two generations, effective teaching and learning strategies were introduced through technology based education. Feedback was received from the new orienteer through an online survey tool. The computer provided a step by step procedure and self paced program. Lecture styles are primarily power point and individual speakers. This allows for personal interactionù many need more than someone reading a particular slide presentation. To measure the overall effectiveness of the program, we offered online evaluations in order to provide feedback. Evaluation the responses based on different generation, learning styles and prior computer training. Additional training and ongoing teaching strategies will require additional staff with technology backgrounds. In conclusion we noted a need to continue a combination of the two lecture styles, while further evaluation of generational difference will need to be evaluated. This development and effectiveness of teaching alone does not integrated computer technology as the primary teaching source. Further advancement in technology will cause curriculums to increase collaboration, critical thinking and problem solving through the use of the computer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:03Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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