2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165131
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
THYROIDECTOMY: THE AMBULATORY NURSE'S ROLE IN PREVENTING LONG-TERM SEQUELAE
Author(s):
Solan, Jill; McKiernan, Janet
Author Details:
Jill Solan, RN MS ANP OCN, Clinical nurse, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: solanj@mskcc.org; Janet McKiernan, RN, BSN, OCN
Abstract:
In 2006 there will be over 30,000 new cases of thyroid cancer. The most common types are papillary and follicular. Small encapsulated cancers carry an excellent prognosis, with thyroidectomy the mainstay of treatment. Consequences of treatment include short-term hypoparathyroidism, which can cause hypocalcemia, and long-term loss of thyroid function. Calcium and hormone replacement is essential to maintain metabolic stability. Ambulatory nurses play an integral role in monitoring labs and educating patients how to adjust their doses to prevent hypo/hypercalcemia and hypo/hyperthyroidism. This abstract will review the endocrine functions of the parathyroid and thyroid glands and discuss the nurseÆs role in collaboratively managing calcium and hormone replacement. Serum calcium levels are obtained the evening and first morning after thyroidectomy. Intravenous or oral calcium tablets are administered depending on the severity of hypocalcemia. Labs are monitored regularly and patients are instructed to report signs and symptoms of hypo/hypercalcemia. Calcium doses are adjusted accordingly. Patients are also informed of the need for lifelong thyroxine replacement. Thyroid function tests and thyroglobulin are obtained 6 weeks after surgery. The nurse communicates the blood results to the surgeon and endocrinologist to determine the need for dose adjustment. Thyroxine dose will be based on the level of free T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The dose is adjusted to prevent hypo/hyperthyroidism and to suppress the pituitary from releasing TSH which could stimulate the development of recurrent disease. Blood work is repeated in 4 to 6 weeks each time the dosage of thyroxine has been adjusted. Patients are instructed to report signs and symptoms of hyper/hypothyroidism. Thyroglobulin levels as tumor markers are also monitored regularly. Ambulatory nurses play a key role in the long-term management of patients post-thyroidectomy by monitoring labs and instructing patients about needed replacement therapies. Thyroidectomy is an effective treatment for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. However, it is not without risk. It is imperative that nurses have sufficient knowledge to collaborate with multidisciplines to ensure survivors resume their life without long-term effects of their treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTHYROIDECTOMY: THE AMBULATORY NURSE'S ROLE IN PREVENTING LONG-TERM SEQUELAEen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSolan, Jillen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKiernan, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJill Solan, RN MS ANP OCN, Clinical nurse, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: solanj@mskcc.org; Janet McKiernan, RN, BSN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165131-
dc.description.abstractIn 2006 there will be over 30,000 new cases of thyroid cancer. The most common types are papillary and follicular. Small encapsulated cancers carry an excellent prognosis, with thyroidectomy the mainstay of treatment. Consequences of treatment include short-term hypoparathyroidism, which can cause hypocalcemia, and long-term loss of thyroid function. Calcium and hormone replacement is essential to maintain metabolic stability. Ambulatory nurses play an integral role in monitoring labs and educating patients how to adjust their doses to prevent hypo/hypercalcemia and hypo/hyperthyroidism. This abstract will review the endocrine functions of the parathyroid and thyroid glands and discuss the nurseÆs role in collaboratively managing calcium and hormone replacement. Serum calcium levels are obtained the evening and first morning after thyroidectomy. Intravenous or oral calcium tablets are administered depending on the severity of hypocalcemia. Labs are monitored regularly and patients are instructed to report signs and symptoms of hypo/hypercalcemia. Calcium doses are adjusted accordingly. Patients are also informed of the need for lifelong thyroxine replacement. Thyroid function tests and thyroglobulin are obtained 6 weeks after surgery. The nurse communicates the blood results to the surgeon and endocrinologist to determine the need for dose adjustment. Thyroxine dose will be based on the level of free T4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). The dose is adjusted to prevent hypo/hyperthyroidism and to suppress the pituitary from releasing TSH which could stimulate the development of recurrent disease. Blood work is repeated in 4 to 6 weeks each time the dosage of thyroxine has been adjusted. Patients are instructed to report signs and symptoms of hyper/hypothyroidism. Thyroglobulin levels as tumor markers are also monitored regularly. Ambulatory nurses play a key role in the long-term management of patients post-thyroidectomy by monitoring labs and instructing patients about needed replacement therapies. Thyroidectomy is an effective treatment for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. However, it is not without risk. It is imperative that nurses have sufficient knowledge to collaborate with multidisciplines to ensure survivors resume their life without long-term effects of their treatment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:13:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:13:04Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name32nd Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationLas Vegas, Nevada, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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